Author Topic: New Prospect.  (Read 1257 times)

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Offline 32dgrz

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Re: New Prospect.
Reply #10 on: July 14, 2020, 01:24:55 AM
Grease? The kind you have.   :002:

Offline Twempie

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Re: New Prospect.
Reply #11 on: July 14, 2020, 03:22:14 AM
*Originally Posted by 32dgrz [+]
Grease? The kind you have.   :002:
Well thatís that fettled.

Offline Twempie

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Re: New Prospect.
Reply #12 on: July 14, 2020, 03:42:02 AM
Seriously, because of the steering head bearings take so much abuse, I was wondering if thereís any advantages to using marine grade grease to extend the life of the bearings. It gets pretty wet up here in the Pacific Northwest

I have plenty generic auto parts store grease, but will probably be ordering this synthetic water-resistant grease from Amsoil for the bearing upgrade.
https://www.amsoil.com/p/synthetic-water-resistant-grease-gwr/?code=GWR3P-EA#pills-home_0

Offline Twempie

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Re: New Prospect.
Reply #13 on: July 16, 2020, 04:42:37 AM
No going back now.





Online Jonathan

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Re: New Prospect.
Reply #14 on: July 25, 2020, 11:50:03 PM
*Originally Posted by Twempie [+]
Thanks for the tip. I’ve just watched Juan’s how-to vŪdeo on how to change out the steering head bearings, and decided to give it a go.

All Balls are out of stock of the 22-1020 kit (2018 ABS), so I had to go to Amazon. Amazon’s algorithms informed me that the kit would not fit my bike, but fitment was confirmed in the product description.

This whole project is right at the outer edges of my home mechanic experience, and will be an adventure.

One question (and I hope this doesn’t turn into an oil thread), what’s the preferred grease for those bearings?

for bearings with a highish load but no real temperature generated during operation, any decent general purpose lithium grease will be fine. SKF do great stuff if you can get it. For swingarm pivots bearings and joints, use a designated 'waterproof' grease (Yes, I know all grease is waterproof, but some washes out much more easily)
Last Edit: July 25, 2020, 11:52:28 PM by Jonathan

Offline Twempie

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Re: New Prospect.
Reply #15 on: July 26, 2020, 01:28:42 AM
*Originally Posted by Jonathan [+]
for bearings with a highish load but no real temperature generated during operation, any decent general purpose lithium grease will be fine. SKF do great stuff if you can get it. For swingarm pivots bearings and joints, use a designated 'waterproof' grease (Yes, I know all grease is waterproof, but some washes out much more easily)
Thank you. I was out of my usual cheap grease, so treated the bike to a big tub of expensive Motorex. Probably last until I retire.
https://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/parts/motorex-long-term-grease-2000-p


Offline Twempie

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Re: New Prospect.
Reply #16 on: July 27, 2020, 03:35:33 AM
Today, I installed the L2 rear shock, reservoir and preload adjuster. Few tips for those that are pre-pandemic solo-wrenchers and are thinking of updating their ABS Xís.

Get a cheap dirt bike stand to help hold the swing-arm (also helps with work on front forks).
Wrap the spring in bubble wrap when installing/positioning the shock if you donít want any part of the spring damaged, then remove the wrap after the top bolt goes in.
A lot of the vids are for non ABS bikes. ABS bikes have a big plastic box that hinders access to the top of the shock. Plan accordingly.
Use blue painters tape to hold bolts, washers and deep sockets together when necessary.
Have an extendable magnet tool handy.

Invest in new bushings for rear wheels and the new dog bone before you start work, as the original bushings from the OEM dog bone may have surface rust, and new wheels deserve new bushings.

Itís a bit awkward, but if you take your time, itís not the worst job youíll ever do.






Last Edit: July 27, 2020, 03:39:42 AM by Twempie

Offline Twempie

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Re: New Prospect.
Reply #17 on: July 29, 2020, 06:04:43 PM
Seeing the legend of the security bolts didn't prove as difficult as expected (the heads fell off after drilling and I easily unscrewed the remainder of the bolts with my Leatherman pliers), I waited for the other shoe to drop... and it did drop yesterday. Other than the description written below, the whole upgrade procedure is pretty straightforward - if you take your time, read the instructions thoroughly and watch Juan Browne's videos, then refer to back to them as you progress.

One note if you have an ABS bike. Take a look at the short Rally Raid videos to supplement Juan's - RR videos are on an ABS bike, and they show there's a little bit of a different way install the shock absorber. Also, if you're installing new steering head bearings, the bottom bearings are a little trickier to hammer home because there's a hose that is close to the bottom of the head tube. Again, patience will get you through that part. I have a 2018 ABS.

To the other shoe dropping:
The Rally Raid rear wheel has a race/bushing that hangs loose inside the wheel, which makes mounting the rear wheel quite awkward when working alone. The jigsaw of parts all need to line up - two chain adjusters (held with blue painter's tape), the rear brake assembly that needs to slide on to the swing-arm tab, two collars on each side of the wheel that are only held by new grease. Then sliding in the axle from the left, and with the help of a Motion Pro lightweight T-handle poked into the hole to jimmy the loose collar into a position on the right side (takes an inordinate amount of time to get that right). I also employed the help of the 17mm shaft from my Baja No Pinch tool on the right side to help keep things aligned. The wheel is not light, and awkward to position when working alone.

I've never seen a loose bushing in all the wheels I've changed over the years, and I hope this will seat correctly inside the wheel by the time the next tyre-change rolls around (pun intended).

Rally Raid is very responsive to questions and the shipping times from the UK are fantastic.



Offline CBRDEAN0

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Re: New Prospect.
Reply #18 on: July 30, 2020, 08:45:06 AM
I use a piece of aluminium tube that just fits in to the wheel & bearings.
once the wheel is in place - i use the axle bolt to push the aluminium tube through.

Offline Twempie

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Re: New Prospect.
Reply #19 on: July 30, 2020, 04:36:03 PM
*Originally Posted by CBRDEAN0 [+]
I use a piece of aluminium tube that just fits in to the wheel & bearings.
once the wheel is in place - i use the axle bolt to push the aluminium tube through.
Yes, I'll be contacting my machinist friend to cut me an appropriately sized aluminium pipe.