Honda CB500X

Main CB500X Boards => Maintenance and Servicing => Topic started by: thefip on October 29, 2017, 05:05:12 AM

Title: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: thefip on October 29, 2017, 05:05:12 AM
Dear all,
what is your average chain kit lifespan?

Thanks for sharing your experience.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: glencoeman on October 29, 2017, 07:29:18 AM
It depends on a number of things really. If you clean and lubricate the chain regularly and not go off road, it will last easily for 12,000 miles (about 18,000 kms) - even more if ridden gently. However, if you neglect the chain maintenance, it will wear out a lot earlier than 12k miles. It is really up to each owner how they treat and ride the bike as far as chain life goes. When the chain does wear out, it makes sense to uprate to a higher spec than the OE chain ( I use DID chains)but you can use original OE sprockets.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: enterprise-psi on October 29, 2017, 12:27:00 PM
My first chain lasted 15.000 km , but i only oiled it twice, and cleaned it once.  :008:

Now , im oiling every 500km, and cleaning every 1000.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: jsonder on October 29, 2017, 03:40:02 PM
There have been a lot of comments about the quality of the OEM chain.  Mine had two stiff links as delivered new.  At 15K miles I decided to test the Delboy's Garage thesis that changing the drive sprocket early would extend chain life.  Medical problems kept me off of the bike much of the summer, but I have added another thousand miles to the chain.  It is still tight on the rear sprocket, so wear appears to be minimal.  I lube frequently with ATF.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: reavsie on October 30, 2017, 03:47:33 PM
Scottoiler and regular cleaning:

OEM chain so far on 34,700 miles and still in the green on the wear marks.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: marktbike on October 31, 2017, 09:06:53 AM
I had to change it at 20,000 km not because of wear but because of stiff links. The OEM chain was really cheap and regular lubrication didn't help to prolonge its life, even in absence of any off road use.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: UnmzldOx on November 09, 2017, 04:03:30 AM
28 kmiles on OEM chain. Spray with Lucas daily after 55 mile commute. Rarely clean anymore. That might just drive grit into gaps that tend to stay grit free by normal lapping action when running. Maybe 1 or 2 mm adjustment so far. Watching one stiff link, but seems to be ok.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: jsonder on January 21, 2018, 06:16:31 PM
Here's the link to the Delboy's Garage video on chain life and front sprocket replacement:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UxD3qdD7LhE (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UxD3qdD7LhE)
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: uku383 on January 21, 2018, 07:24:44 PM
Delboy's changed his position on front sprocket replacement. He now advises that changing the front sprocket mid-chain life is not necessary as front sprockets are made of tougher material than they used to be.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: jsonder on January 22, 2018, 03:54:48 AM
Interesting.

Here is picture take of the 500X's drive sprocket at nearly 15K miles.  Note that some hooking is starting to develop in the drive sprocket.

I replaced the drive sprocket to see how much mileage I could get out of the OEM chain.  Still testing that.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Dukie on January 24, 2018, 10:29:57 AM
On 3rd chain at 20000.
Very unhappy. It was stiff links not wear
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: jsonder on January 24, 2018, 04:41:13 PM
Yup, my bike had a couple of stiff links when brand new. 

I lube the chain every 100-200 miles with ATF (yes, I installed a centerstand).  I will report on when the chain finally starts stretching and needs to be replaced.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: HerrDeacon on January 24, 2018, 04:47:47 PM
*Originally Posted by Dukie [+]
On 3rd chain at 20000.
Very unhappy. It was stiff links not wear

What brand chains did you go with as the second and third ones? Seems extremely short life.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: kurth83 on January 24, 2018, 09:28:03 PM
I have yet to wear out a chain on this bike, but I generally switch to DID X-Ring Gold's when I buy a new bike.  On previous bikes I have gotten 20k miles (their rated life) out of X-Ring's even with very little maintenance (I abuse them pretty bad - basically clean them real good and put DuPont Teflon Dry Lube on it, which doesn't attract dirt.  The chain pretty much stays clean forever and I relube at oil changes every 4k miles, yeah it's lame, but the X-Rings do ok anyway).  I do clean and relube if it gets wet so it gets more attention during the rainy season. :-)
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Dukie on January 25, 2018, 05:34:24 AM
*Originally Posted by HerrDeacon [+]
What brand chains did you go with as the second and third ones? Seems extremely short life.

Honda OEM, replacing chain and sprocket at the same time and lubing and cleaning every 800 miles.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: SnowOwl on January 25, 2018, 01:57:54 PM
I don't have a huge number of miles yet, just 6300+.  My chain maintenance routine is to spray it with DuPont Chain Saver weekly and check slack.  So about every 150-200 miles.  Then once a month clean it with Kerosene and brush, let dry and Spray with DuPont Chain Saver.  Chain and sprockets look to be in good shape at this point.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: bigbobby on January 25, 2018, 08:39:08 PM
The first two chains lasted 20,000km each. I used Motul lube and cleaned them every 500km or so. I then fitted a Scott eOiler and the third chain has just past 20,000km and will last another 20,000km or so if everything stays the same. I did extend the cleaning to every 1,000km though but the chain is far cleaner. The Scott systems are surprisingly good for chains and sprockets.

I imagine the other brand auto oilers would have the same effect.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Pigeonherd on January 25, 2018, 09:08:23 PM
*Originally Posted by reavsie [+]
Scottoiler and regular cleaning:

OEM chain so far on 34,700 miles and still in the green on the wear marks.
:005: :047:

I'm glad this thread is here, I was annoyed by the idea of having to replace my OEM at 11-12k miles due to stiff/binding links and not wear (clean & lube approximately every 2-3 tank fills). But now I know it's a "thing" and that I'll be investing in an auto-lube solution.

Philosophically: do you think the wonky OEM chain is like this on purpose to get us to change it long before wear occurs? Is it possible throwing a crap chain on there was Honda's way of making the bike appear more budget friendly, knowing that it is something that needs periodic replacement anyway and we'd all be replacing them with better equipment at some point so may as well save $X (no pun intended) by making it a sooner-rather-than-later type thing?
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: jsonder on January 26, 2018, 01:39:12 PM
I suspect that it is a Thai quality control issue at the DID factory, similar in nature to the frequently over-tightened bolts on the 500X.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Dukie on January 26, 2018, 05:09:56 PM
My screen bracket bolts on the 17 model are ridiculous.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Nortoon on January 26, 2018, 09:17:00 PM
I cleaned and lubed my chain after every second ride (800 to 1,000 kilometers) using Motul Cleaner and Chain Lube. After spending an afternoon cleaning the front sprocket area, I switched to Castrol chain lube. My chain lasted 25,000 kilometers, and I seldom needed to adjust it. When I replaced the chain the sprockets looked good, but I replaced them anyway.

On my new bike I got tired of black tar-like chain lube fling on the back rim and spokes. So I now use Tirox Synthetic Chain Wax. No more messy chain fling and the chain stays cleaner. I still use Motul Chain Cleaner on the chain and any oil change droplets on the garage floor.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: theMerryone on February 08, 2018, 07:16:20 AM
Hi all,
My "X" was bought new last year and after 4000 miles it is nearly a year old. The bike is used daily, commuting to work with the odd long trip undertaken when required.  The "X" is in entirely standard form with the exception of the addition of a Top box and Knuckle Guards.

I've not needed to adjust the chain yet as the slack is still comfortably within the tolerances specified by Honda. Chain tension is even all the way round, with no tight spots.

I don't use any fancy aerosol Chain lube but 80w -90 Gear Oil which I apply with a toothbrush. Oil fling is minimal, and the chain still looks very clean.   This has been done once per week, irrespective of mileage, twice weekly during wet and Winter months as our roads are often gritted.

I'm certainly intrigued to see how long the chain and sprokets will last.  Only time will tell......

:))
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Superplasma on February 08, 2018, 09:47:12 AM
*Originally Posted by theMerryone [+]
Hi all,
My "X" was bought new last year and after 4000 miles it is nearly a year old. The bike is used daily, commuting to work with the odd long trip undertaken when required.  The "X" is in entirely standard form with the exception of the addition of a Top box and Knuckle Guards.

I've not needed to adjust the chain yet as the slack is still comfortably within the tolerances specified by Honda. Chain tension is even all the way round, with no tight spots.

I don't use any fancy aerosol Chain lube but 80w -90 Gear Oil which I apply with a toothbrush. Oil fling is minimal, and the chain still looks very clean.   This has been done once per week, irrespective of mileage, twice weekly during wet and Winter months as our roads are often gritted.

I'm certainly intrigued to see how long the chain and sprokets will last.  Only time will tell......

:))

+1, that's what I use on my chain,80-90 gear oil, never had a problem.

superplasmer
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Mark65 on February 08, 2018, 01:21:48 PM
120w gear oil, Westway Lubes on Fleabay, about £8 a litre, sticks like honey in the winter.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Pigeonherd on February 08, 2018, 07:10:01 PM
OEM chain removed at 11,7xx miles and replaced with RK MAX X-ring in black by local shop. So far (day 2) the ride is SO MUCH NICER. Not sure about nicer than new stock, but definitely nicer than it was. Will report back if this changes. :)
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: reavsie on February 17, 2018, 06:08:59 PM
*Originally Posted by reavsie [+]
Scottoiler and regular cleaning:

OEM chain so far on 34,700 miles and still in the green on the wear marks.

Replaced the chain & sprockets today at 37,625.

Only ever had to adjust it once. Sprockets starting to wear and had a couple of stiff links I'd been keeping an eye on for a while.

I'm sure it would have lasted till 40,000 but needed a rear tyre as well, so made sense to do both at the same time to reduce labour charges.

Scottoiler has paid for itself with the extended mileage, I've never had a chain last beyond 12 - 16k before.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: faded_Glory on February 19, 2018, 11:37:28 AM
I had to replace the OEM chain at 10,000 miles, it was totally shot. I installed a Tutoro chain oiler but can't get it to work properly, so instead I use spray lube fairly regularly. I can't be bothered with cleaning the chain.

I replaced it with an aftermarket DID chain and am now on 16,000 miles. The plan is to do a big summer trip of at least 5000 miles. I'm trying to decide if I want to change the chain before that or wait and see how it goes. From the sound of you guys I should be ok with this replacement chain.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Mark65 on February 19, 2018, 11:43:19 AM
I was lucky enough to grab a new OEM Honda front and rear sprocket off Fleabay for £20 last night, might not need it for another year or so but why not. My chain is still at the start of the green zone for wear with 5500 miles on it.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: funky on February 19, 2018, 02:54:28 PM
Im now at 14.000km and my chain has about 4-5 stiff links, dont know what to do.
Been to the dealer, the mechanic told me that he can try to change it under warranty (still have it), but he has to ask his boss, because the chain is treated by the rules of Honda as a part that has to be replaced in some time and because of that they can reject my warranty for that kind of parts.
Wanted to ask, is it better to change it for OEM O-ring chain or for X-ring chain (D.I.D)?
And yes, mine is near the red line so it will need replacement soon  :006:
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: rambrose on February 19, 2018, 08:02:27 PM
Funky, as you said the chain is due replacement (Stretched to the red indicator) I think it is unlikely you'll get it replaced under warranty.
However there is no harm in trying. Worst case is that you'll have to buy a new chain.

I bought a "JT" X ring chain for my YBR and I've been impressed with how little I've had to adjust it ( 3 times in a year\5000 miles).
The standard DID chain that came with the bike needed adjusting every 3 weeks.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: funky on February 19, 2018, 08:16:59 PM
Yes, he told me he will ask and if the answer is NO, then I will replace it definetly :)

I'm just fascinated that the chain lasts so little miles/kilometers. Friend told me that he changed chain on 600RR when the bike had 37.000 km, thats more than double than my chain. He rides definitely more agressive than me  :008:

But I read this thread and noticed that many people changed their OEM chain before 15.000km. So I figured that thats the max life for this chain...
Next one will be definitely X ring, maybe there is difference, maybe not, will find out :D

I didn't use any chain oilers, maybe that was the problem, but i lubricated the chain every 300-400km. I bought Cobra Nemo 2 chain oiler a few days ago, maybe the next chain will last longer with chain oiler, definitely will be simpler for me  :001:

Can I use some method to loosen the stiff links on my chain? And can the stiff links damage anything else, is it safe to drive with them until I replace my chain?
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Pocketpete on February 25, 2018, 10:33:01 AM
My original chain ran out of adjustment at 7000miles. Very disappiinted. Bought a new did gold chain. Done 7000miles and I've not even adjusted yet.
Maintained it the same. Show standard chain is pants.

Mainly used for commuting.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: andystracey on March 02, 2018, 12:16:13 AM
I hear so many people talk about regular cleaning and lubricating chains.
I admit, I am lazy, but I never clean the chain, occasionally it gets some chain lube and thatís it. I ride all year round on filthy salty wet uk roads and my chain has done over 20,000 miles. I completely understand the cleaning philosophy but does this do as much damage as good. ďIf it ainít broke, donít fix itĒ.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: UnmzldOx on March 05, 2018, 03:42:09 AM
At 30.6 kmiles on the original chain and sprockets, the drive sprocket was looking a bit pointy. After reading some of the posts on this forum and looking more at the drive sprocket, I started to worry that the chain would slip and jam up at the drive sprocket while I'm passing a truck or something worse. So I just finished replacing the chain and sprockets this weekend. Bought new OEM sprockets and X ring 112 link online. Here are some of the lessons:

It felt wrong to grind down and punch out a pin of what appeared to be a good chain, but after looking at the stiff links and stiff O ring, I agree with the common advice; replace chain and sprockets together. In my case, the drive sprocket was the limiting part. The chain and rear sprocket had more life, but that's the logic of it. The new chain and sprocket are silky smooth together.

One last thought or question really: The pins are pre-greased and essentially sealed with O rings at the factory except for the master link which we lube and seal. Only the O rings are exposed to our application of oil. Does that mean that we're oiling the chain to prevent O ring's overheating due to friction? Or does some of the oil work its way past O rings to the pins?


(https://cdn.img.cb500x.com/P1010217.jpg)
(https://cdn.img.cb500x.com/P1010220.jpg)
(https://cdn.img.cb500x.com/P1010223.jpg)
(https://cdn.img.cb500x.com/P1010224.jpg)
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: John1411 on March 05, 2018, 06:39:04 AM
*Originally Posted by UnmzldOx [+]
One last thought or question really: The pins are pre-greased and essentially sealed with O rings at the factory except for the master link which we lube and seal. Only the O rings are exposed to our application of oil. Does that mean that we're oiling the chain to prevent O ring's overheating due to friction? Or does some of the oil work its way past O rings to the pins?

I'd say that the oil helps reduce friction between the chain's rollers and the sprockets, lubricates the O rings to help them flexible which will help them to keep the muck out / grease in and also helps reduce any corrosion on the links. The last item being the least important IMO.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Superplasma on March 05, 2018, 05:11:03 PM
*Originally Posted by John1411 [+]
I'd say that the oil helps reduce friction between the chain's rollers and the sprockets, lubricates the O rings to help them flexible which will help them to keep the muck out / grease in and also helps reduce any corrosion on the links. The last item being the least important IMO.

+1,I think the same.

Superplasma.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: SnowOwl on March 05, 2018, 08:20:42 PM
*Originally Posted by John1411 [+]
I'd say that the oil helps reduce friction between the chain's rollers and the sprockets, lubricates the O rings to help them flexible which will help them to keep the muck out / grease in and also helps reduce any corrosion on the links. The last item being the least important IMO.
Yup, exactly!  :152:  I would also add that regular cleaning removes the grit that will accelerate wear at the sprocket to chain interface.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: jsonder on March 05, 2018, 10:01:18 PM
UnmzldOx, I took a couple of link sides off of the old chain (grinder in the drill made short work of the pins) and drilled them out to easily slip over the pins of the new master link.  After lubing and assembling the master link, I used the old sides to compress the master link using two c-clamps.  Generally I wait 5 minutes, tighten the clamps a bit, wait another 5 minutes and do it one more time, and then install the master link clip.  With two link sides for the master link pins to project into, there is no problem compressing the real master link side plate enough to make installing the clip a breeze, once the c-clamps and extra side plates are removed..
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Pigeonherd on March 05, 2018, 10:15:09 PM
*Originally Posted by jsonder [+]
UnmzldOx, I took a couple of link sides off of the old chain (grinder in the drill made short work of the pins) and drilled them out to easily slip over the pins of the new master link.  After lubing and assembling the master link, I used the old sides to compress the master link using two c-clamps.  Generally I wait 5 minutes, tighten the clamps a bit, wait another 5 minutes and do it one more time, and then install the master link clip.  With two link sides for the master link pins to project into, there is no problem compressing the real master link side plate enough to make installing the clip a breeze, once the c-clamps and extra side plates are removed..
Wouldn't this make the new master link tighter (and internally narrower) than all the other links? Or is this only an issue for riveted masters? Do links with clips basically widen back out to as far as they can before butting up against the clip?

Relevant moment is at 6:45 but apparently I can't link timestamps...
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: UnmzldOx on March 06, 2018, 02:28:49 AM
All good comments. The jig made from a drilled out link is a good idea. The old dirt bike master links were not as precise as these. Looking for 20 kmiles on this "kit", as your say. Thanks.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: jsonder on March 06, 2018, 04:21:12 PM
*Originally Posted by Pigeonherd [+]
Wouldn't this make the new master link tighter (and internally narrower) than all the other links? Or is this only an issue for riveted masters? Do links with clips basically widen back out to as far as they can before butting up against the clip?


There are indentations in the master link pins that position the clip.  That determines the width of the link.  Basically, the o-rings or x-rings expand back out once the compression is removed.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Pigeonherd on March 06, 2018, 07:01:28 PM
*Originally Posted by jsonder [+]
There are indentations in the master link pins that position the clip.  That determines the width of the link.  Basically, the o-rings or x-rings expand back out once the compression is removed.
Good to know, thanks  :028:
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: funky on March 24, 2018, 09:55:34 AM
Replaced my factory chain with D.I.D Gold 520VX2.  :046:

Wanted to ask, I got a rivet link with the chain and also the clip link. I used the clip ling because i don't have the tools for riveting.
Has anybody been using this clip link, is it safe to ride with it?  :006:

If its OK to ride i would use clip link, if its safer to use rivet link i will find someone to replace it and rivet the other one...  :169:
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: uku383 on March 24, 2018, 10:18:30 AM
*Originally Posted by funky [+]
Replaced my factory chain with D.I.D Gold 520VX2.  :046:

Wanted to ask, I got a rivet link with the chain and also the clip link. I used the clip ling because i don't have the tools for riveting.
Has anybody been using this clip link, is it safe to ride with it?  :006:

If its OK to ride i would use clip link, if its safer to use rivet link i will find someone to replace it and rivet the other one...  :169:

You can use the clip link, but riveting is safer.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Superplasma on March 24, 2018, 10:31:55 AM
*Originally Posted by uku383 [+]
You can use the clip link, but riveting is safer.

+1, as said  riveting when done good is best, but I have used a clip link in the past with no problem.

Superplasma.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: funky on March 24, 2018, 12:34:11 PM
Ok, thank you!  :152:
Will ride with the clip for now... My friend maybe has a riveting tool so will call him to swap the clip link if he has it  :002:
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: AJC500 on March 24, 2018, 04:51:01 PM
Used the clip on my last bikes replacement chain, make sure clip is fitted the right way, with the curved end facing the direction of chain travel - had no problems.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Pocketpete on March 30, 2018, 09:25:40 PM
Oem chain had 3 stiff links when new. The bike supplier said they were ok. I wasn't happy. At my first service I pointed them out again and said I wanted a new chain. They then said the chain wasn't covered under warranty yes right.. eventually after the threat of legal action they swapped it.. especially as I had pictures and the mechanics notes..

The second chain lasted 3000miles before I got a couple of stiff links it gave up thdcghost at 7000miles despite being well looked after. Swapped it for a good quality did gold chain. Done 9000 on it and it's perfect only adjusted it once.

 
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: uku383 on March 31, 2018, 06:04:30 AM
I'm a big advocate of investing in a quality chain. I don't see the point of installing a cheap chain, only to have to replace it ridiculously early. That said, it probably matters little if you only use your bike for the occasional weekend ride.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: motorboy on April 01, 2018, 05:07:38 PM
*Originally Posted by uku383 [+]
I'm a big advocate of investing in a quality chain. I don't see the point of installing a cheap chain, only to have to replace it ridiculously early. That said, it probably matters little if you only use your bike for the occasional weekend ride.

Ditto-- my replacement chains for many years- many bikes has been a EK SRX- big bang for the bucks
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Pocketpete on April 01, 2018, 05:43:38 PM
The original honda oem  chains realky rubbish. A few people have got decent mileage out of them but the majority havent. The second chain the dealer fitted was a honda chain. I oil and cleaned it every time I used the bike. Still poor quality. Swapped it for the DID gold chain totally different. Oil the same clean the same yet it's lasted 9000miles and only been adjusted once. I reckon i will get 20k out it.

My previous bike a Suzuki I got 22k out of the chain.  It's just poor quality by honda.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Off road nut on April 03, 2018, 09:02:55 PM
My 2017, OE chain started to properly stretch and has just about run out of adjustment now at 12000 miles.
I've ordered the DID X ring and renthal sprockets, I've used renthal and DID loads of times on previous motorcycles and I really rate them.
OE chains are generally rubbish but I'm quite surprised it lasted so long on a budget bike like the 500X.
 
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: sbeadg on April 21, 2018, 08:14:00 PM
I only managed 21k miles out of the original chain and sprockets WITH a Tutoro oiler installed.  To be fair, I do a fair bit of dirt road riding.  Just had a DID "gold plated" Ring chain and sprockets, so looking for double that this set.  I've used Tutoro's oil and, after reading about ATF fluid, plan to mix that in 50/50 hoping for less build-up.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Joey1347 on April 30, 2018, 12:21:42 PM
Just like many others, I think the OEM chain is rubbish.

After only 10000Kms (6200miles) I had many stiff links despite a weekly oiling. At the 12000Km service, the dealer told my that my chain kit was dead. I'm still using it and my mechanic (different from the dealer) told me that I could expect getting the chain to 20 000Kms before replacing it.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: sbeadg on April 30, 2018, 01:44:14 PM
*Originally Posted by Joey1347 [+]
Just like many others, I think the OEM chain is rubbish.

After only 10000Kms (6200miles) I had many stiff links despite a weekly oiling. At the 12000Km service, the dealer told my that my chain kit was dead. I'm still using it and my mechanic (different from the dealer) told me that I could expect getting the chain to 20 000Kms before replacing it.
I wouldn't plan on going far from home in the meantime... :035:  Actually, it will make annoying clatter sounds before it becomes dyer.  I'd have a new set at the ready, though.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Joey1347 on May 04, 2018, 11:52:09 AM
Thank you for the advice, I'll keep it mind if I go on a long trip this summer ;)

For now it's mostly used for commuting and I don't hear any suspicious sound coming from the chain, we'll see how it gets in the future !
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: sbeadg on May 04, 2018, 02:04:52 PM
You can probably extend your chain's life a bit by giving it a good dowsing with WD or other penetrating oil and moving the stuck links back and forth with a vise grips.  When I finally did replace chain and sprockets, the front sprocket points were almost non-existent.  So, don't think, just because the chain isn't noisy, you're O.K.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Bama_Rider on June 21, 2018, 06:27:57 AM
My chain maintenance on my more powerful road bikes is this.  Laugh if you want but my VFR800VTEC manual said to use 80/90 gear oil and that's what I use on everything now.  Every 500 miles I brush a nice coat of gear oil onto the chain with a cheap solder flux brush.  Then I run the chain through a rag to wipe off the excess oil and the dirt it lifted. My chains always look brand new with no other cleaning.  Canned chain goo's of all stripes are a waste of money and ruin chains unless you clean religiously.   Doing this any decent o'ring or x'ring chain will last close to 30,000 miles.  If you change the chain at 25K instead of waiting for it to wear out you will get two chains worth of life out of a sprocket set.  O'ring chains don't really "stretch" until the seals are worn out.  During that 25k miles, one adjustment at about 500 when it wears in a little, then nothing until I change it.  When the seals fail, it will need adjusting every 500 miles while it is eating your sprockets.   These are road miles.  If you ride in the dirt a lot it will be less but the method still works well.  Not when you feel like it, or when you remember, reset the B trip odo when you lube the chain and do it again at 500 miles.  With a centerstand or swingarm stand, it takes about 5 minutes.  When touring I take a ziplock bag with a solder brush, a 2 ounce vial of gear oil and a shop rag rolled up tight. Takes up less space than that can of goo.  That's good for around about 3 lubrications so if I lube before I leave, 2,000 miles.  I am touring on a shaft drive bike now but my other two are chains and I do the same regime.  My VFR's OEM Honda chain lasted until I changed it at 25K and when I sold the bike 16k miles later the chain and original sprockets were still in good shape.  The current owner put on another 5 or so and still good.

My 500X had 9400 on it when I bought it and the PO probably used canned goo and infrequent  cleaning like most people so I am not expecting this one to have much more life in it.  My canned goo experience is around 12k for a chain.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Superplasma on June 21, 2018, 09:22:23 AM
*Originally Posted by Bama_Rider [+]
My chain maintenance on my more powerful road bikes is this.  Laugh if you want but my VFR800VTEC manual said to use 80/90 gear oil and that's what I use on everything now.  Every 500 miles I brush a nice coat of gear oil onto the chain with a cheap solder flux brush.  Then I run the chain through a rag to wipe off the excess oil and the dirt it lifted. My chains always look brand new with no other cleaning.  Canned chain goo's of all stripes are a waste of money and ruin chains unless you clean religiously.   Doing this any decent o'ring or x'ring chain will last close to 30,000 miles.  If you change the chain at 25K instead of waiting for it to wear out you will get two chains worth of life out of a sprocket set.  O'ring chains don't really "stretch" until the seals are worn out.  During that 25k miles, one adjustment at about 500 when it wears in a little, then nothing until I change it.  When the seals fail, it will need adjusting every 500 miles while it is eating your sprockets.   These are road miles.  If you ride in the dirt a lot it will be less but the method still works well.  Not when you feel like it, or when you remember, reset the B trip odo when you lube the chain and do it again at 500 miles.  With a centerstand or swingarm stand, it takes about 5 minutes.  When touring I take a ziplock bag with a solder brush, a 2 ounce vial of gear oil and a shop rag rolled up tight. Takes up less space than that can of goo.  That's good for around about 3 lubrications so if I lube before I leave, 2,000 miles.  I am touring on a shaft drive bike now but my other two are chains and I do the same regime.  My VFR's OEM Honda chain lasted until I changed it at 25K and when I sold the bike 16k miles later the chain and original sprockets were still in good shape.  The current owner put on another 5 or so and still good.

My 500X had 9400 on it when I bought it and the PO probably used canned goo and infrequent  cleaning like most people so I am not expecting this one to have much more life in it.  My canned goo experience is around 12k for a chain.



+1, I have all ways done the same,and never had a problem.



Superplasma.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: SnowOwl on June 21, 2018, 04:58:35 PM
With my OEM chain I was using the DuPont ChainSaver spray once a week or about every 200 miles.  Mainly because I keep my bike in the basement and I wanted a dry lube so I didn't have to deal with the oil drips on the floor.  The spray left a coating on the chain that would build up and require kerosene cleaning of the chain about once a month.  That chain lasted about 7800 miles.

So, the new DID-VX2 chain literature said to use 80w-90 gear oil and so does the Honda CB500X manual.  Who am I to second guess them?  After placing a large sheet of paper under the bike I am now using a rolled up old sock to generously apply the oil to the chain weekly or after riding in the rain.  Then I use the oil saturated sock to wipe off the chain to remove most of the excess oil and dirt.  I leave the paper under the bike overnight or until I ride again and will get a few drips of oil loaded with dirt that I think in coming off of the slider and maybe the swingarm.  There might be a drop or two that comes off the chain itself.

The result is a much cleaner chain that has not required a separate kerosene cleaning in the 1300 miles on it so far and I have only had to adjust it once after a hundred miles or so.  After oiling it like this the chain looks new.  The only oil spots on the basement floor are from the oil that slings off the chain on the first ride after oiling and collects on the foot of the center and side stands.  I really need to use a piece of cardboard under the stand foot to catch that oil.  The time I am spending on chain maintenance is no more and maybe less than when I was using the spray considering I don't have to do the monthly kerosene cleaning.

From now on it will only be the chain and bike manual recommended 80w-90 gear oil.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Bama_Rider on June 21, 2018, 06:38:23 PM
*Originally Posted by SnowOwl [+]
With my OEM chain I was using the DuPont ChainSaver spray once a week or about every 200 miles.  Mainly because I keep my bike in the basement and I wanted a dry lube so I didn't have to deal with the oil drips on the floor.  The spray left a coating on the chain that would build up and require kerosene cleaning of the chain about once a month.  That chain lasted about 7800 miles.

I had a guy having an apoplectic fit years ago an another forum when I suggested that the dry chain lube you mentioned was not a proper thing to use on a sealed chain.  The lube's purpose on a sealed chain to is buffer the roller/sprocket interface and, more importantly, lubricate the seals so they don't fail prematurely.  Dry lubes don't keep the seals wet. 7800 miles is failed prematurely to me unless the bike was ridden entirely off road.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: SnowOwl on June 21, 2018, 07:33:16 PM
*Originally Posted by Bama_Rider [+]

I had a guy having an apoplectic fit years ago an another forum when I suggested that the dry chain lube you mentioned was not a proper thing to use on a sealed chain.  The lube's purpose on a sealed chain to is buffer the roller/sprocket interface and, more importantly, lubricate the seals so they don't fail prematurely.  Dry lubes don't keep the seals wet. 7800 miles is failed prematurely to me unless the bike was ridden entirely off road.
It is my commuting and road trip bike, I don't ride it off road.  It sees a little gravel but no more than 2% of all miles.  So, yes, it failed prematurely.  The dry lube didn't do what was needed even when applying it every 200 miles or less.
Using the 80w-90 oil the chain stays much cleaner and I have had zero issues with rust even after riding 20 miles in heavy rain.  After the rainy ride I let it dry overnight and then re-oil in the morning.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: CB-500-X on June 22, 2018, 01:45:37 AM
Never cleaned the chain, ever. Always used DuPont lube. 8k plus miles and 80% plus adjustment left, zero issues with chain or sprockets. I know the chain is cheap but I think people are over cleaning it and killing the seals. If I need to clean it I just dry wipe it down with an old rag , only done this once to twice in 8k miles. I don't ride dirt tho and almost never in the rain. I think my chain will go 15-20k miles.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: SnowOwl on June 22, 2018, 02:03:41 PM
I commute daily in rain or shine and a small part of the commute is gravel road.  That's the price of living out in the sticks.  The chain, and the whole bike for that matter, picks up grit from the gravel road especially when it is wet.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: cerberscr on August 27, 2018, 04:57:39 PM
Hi guys, I need to chain the chain kit but at the moment the Honda dealer does not have in stock the chain, apart of the price of $260.

Any recommendations of brans of models you can give, specially if available on Amazon US?
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Bama_Rider on August 27, 2018, 05:06:17 PM
I think all the major brands make good chains.  No way would I pay Honda dealer price for an OEM one.  I use RK chains exclusively but only because I bought the RK riveting tool and I think it's best to use the tool designed for the chain.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: SnowOwl on August 27, 2018, 07:36:03 PM
I went with the DID X-Ring 520VX2-112.  Make sure it is the VX2, it's the proper strength chain for the 500X.

https://www.amazon.com/520VX2-112-X-Ring-Chain-Connecting-Link/dp/B006O85Q6A
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: cerberscr on August 27, 2018, 08:08:15 PM
Thank you both, Bama_Rider and SnowOwl
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Uncle Tee on August 27, 2018, 10:34:14 PM
*Originally Posted by SnowOwl [+]
I went with the DID X-Ring 520VX2-112.  Make sure it is the VX2, it's the proper strength chain for the 500X.

https://www.amazon.com/520VX2-112-X-Ring-Chain-Connecting-Link/dp/B006O85Q6A

My original wore out at 8,000 miles.
I believe this one will last much longer. It's not stretching nearly as quickly. :002:
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: cerberscr on August 27, 2018, 10:39:42 PM
In my case I sold my first CB500X with 40000 kilometers and never changed the chain kit, and the actual Cb has 23000 km and in line to the change. I feel the wear of parts is faster with this second one.

The same applied to tires and brake pads, wear was 50% faster than the previous CB500.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Mister Paul on October 09, 2018, 10:07:35 PM
*Originally Posted by funky [+]
Yes, he told me he will ask and if the answer is NO, then I will replace it definetly :)

I'm just fascinated that the chain lasts so little miles/kilometers. Friend told me that he changed chain on 600RR when the bike had 37.000 km, thats more than double than my chain. He rides definitely more agressive than me  :008:

But I read this thread and noticed that many people changed their OEM chain before 15.000km. So I figured that thats the max life for this chain...
Next one will be definitely X ring, maybe there is difference, maybe not, will find out :D

I didn't use any chain oilers, maybe that was the problem, but i lubricated the chain every 300-400km. I bought Cobra Nemo 2 chain oiler a few days ago, maybe the next chain will last longer with chain oiler, definitely will be simpler for me  :001:

Can I use some method to loosen the stiff links on my chain? And can the stiff links damage anything else, is it safe to drive with them until I replace my chain?

Hi Funky

Can you tell me where you mounted your nemo, and how you routed the tube?
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Jonathan on October 09, 2018, 11:21:57 PM
*Originally Posted by Mister Paul [+]
Hi Funky

Can you tell me where you mounted your nemo, and how you routed the tube?

here's a little advertized alternative made in the UK...

http://www.pdoiler.co.uk/
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Mister Paul on October 10, 2018, 09:04:10 AM
*Originally Posted by Jonathan [+]
here's a little advertized alternative made in the UK...

http://www.pdoiler.co.uk/

That's another overpriced one. The Nemo is available on eBay and the seller will accept offers. I got one for much less than the pdoiler.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Pocketpete on October 10, 2018, 09:21:42 AM
The chains fall into 2 groups the ones that last 7500-10000miles regardless of how well you look after it and those that last 20k+ miles. Don't know why but my replacement DID chain seems to be lasting forever. Hardly had to adjust it in 5000miles.  I look after them in exactly the same way. My riding style hasn't changed. My daily commute is the same.

Strikes me that honda fitted crap steel ones to cut down on costs knowing that it's a service part and the customer can't claim on warranty.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Joey1347 on October 10, 2018, 10:08:53 AM
Indeed, it seems so !

As far as I'm concerned, my stock chain kit was changed after 20 500 Kms (12 732 Miles) but was really worn out. Even though the chain kit was regularly (every ~500kms) cleaned and lubed.  :114:

We shall see how long the new one lasts.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: enterprise-psi on October 10, 2018, 10:11:54 AM
My stock chain lasted ~15.000 but to be fair i only oiled it 2 or three times .

I installed a tutoro oiler on the new DID one, after ~ 25000km its still brand new, with zero adjustments, and zero interventions from me. I am very satisfied.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: Superplasma on October 10, 2018, 05:01:23 PM
Had a PD oiler on my VFR ,worked well but a bit to big for the CBS,I find itís better to just rub an rag with oil on it over the chain, works well and will not cover the rear tire with oil.


Superplasma.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: catstevecam on October 11, 2018, 09:32:59 PM
*Originally Posted by enterprise-psi [+]
I installed a tutoro oiler on the new DID one, after ~ 25000km its still brand new, with zero adjustments, and zero interventions from me. I am very satisfied.

Sounds like a chain oiler could be the way to go for ease of 'non' maintainance - but £100 could buy a chain kit or quite a few tunes of chain lube . . . . which way to go?
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: ThirtyOne on October 11, 2018, 11:27:29 PM
*Originally Posted by Superplasma [+]
Had a PD oiler on my VFR ,worked well but a bit to big for the CBS,I find itís better to just rub an rag with oil on it over the chain, works well and will not cover the rear tire with oil.


Superplasma.

I've tried a number of chain lubes and techniques. I found if I have the time I'll hold a piece of cardboard or something to shield the wheel.

Love the idea of an oiler but all of the bikes I've seen with them look like hell after some time. Oil fling and grime buildup everywhere.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: enterprise-psi on October 12, 2018, 01:48:36 PM
*Originally Posted by catstevecam [+]
Sounds like a chain oiler could be the way to go for ease of 'non' maintainance - but £100 could buy a chain kit or quite a few tunes of chain lube . . . . which way to go?

Got some pics here.  (https://www.cb500x.com/index.php/topic,6585.msg63451.html#msg63451)

To be honest we did a mass order, a while ago, about 30 people , from a Greek forum ADVride.gr,   and we got a great deal, it costed me around 60 euros (or 52.5 £ or 69.4 $ )
Perhaps the same can be done here ?

So my chain has ~25000 km , and is in great condition, if it remains like this on the next ~15000 km , then i guess it's worth the purchase.
But even if it doesn't,  im ok with not spraying every 500km and cleaning every 1000. Also all those chain lubes are a pain removing them when cleaning, whereas the mineral oil of tutoro is very easy to clean.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: ThirtyOne on November 19, 2018, 12:41:18 AM
Adding a note for posterity. 9,300ish on my 2013. OEM chain has a few kinks and a few frozen links. Will be putting a new chain/sprocket set on the bike asap.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: ewryly on November 19, 2018, 01:46:45 AM
*Originally Posted by ThirtyOne [+]
Adding a note for posterity. 9,300ish on my 2013. OEM chain has a few kinks and a few frozen links. Will be putting a new chain/sprocket set on the bike asap.

Are you sticking with the original sized sprocket?
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: ThirtyOne on November 19, 2018, 02:04:36 AM
I plan to. I'm ok with the gearing for my riding style.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: ewryly on November 19, 2018, 02:14:32 AM
*Originally Posted by ThirtyOne [+]
I plan to. I'm ok with the gearing for my riding style.

Thanks.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: ThirtyOne on November 19, 2018, 04:26:45 AM
*Originally Posted by ewryly [+]
Thanks.

I've thought of going up a tooth in the rear, but it pulls just fine for me.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: uku383 on November 19, 2018, 05:10:15 AM
*Originally Posted by ThirtyOne [+]
I've thought of going up a tooth in the rear, but it pulls just fine for me.

If I was tempted to do anything, it would be to go down at the back, or up at the front. First is a bit low, but I'm happy with stock.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: ewryly on November 19, 2018, 06:37:43 AM
 
*Originally Posted by uku383 [+]
If I was tempted to do anything, it would be to go down at the back, or up at the front. First is a bit low, but I'm happy with stock.

 :0461:
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: ThirtyOne on November 19, 2018, 12:12:41 PM
*Originally Posted by uku383 [+]
If I was tempted to do anything, it would be to go down at the back, or up at the front. First is a bit low, but I'm happy with stock.

Honda, for me, got the gearing just right. With the city riding that I do, and very minimal highway, it picks up and goes as it should.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: gregjet on November 26, 2018, 08:44:06 PM
I agree 31. The CB500x is geared for city riding. There the medium gearing and close ratio gearbox makes sense.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: ewryly on November 26, 2018, 11:44:31 PM
*Originally Posted by gregjet [+]
I agree 31. The CB500x is geared for city riding. There the medium gearing and close ratio gearbox makes sense.

I need to put more miles on mine before I make a change. I'm planning a trip out to Denver this coming summer, and the Midwest highway speeds are 70mph and up. That feels like a strain on this bike compared to my VFR. But I also will try to avoid highways when I can. I won't be in any rush.
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: uku383 on November 26, 2018, 11:55:57 PM
*Originally Posted by ewryly [+]
I need to put more miles on mine before I make a change. I'm planning a trip out to Denver this coming summer, and the Midwest highway speeds are 70mph and up. That feels like a strain on this bike compared to my VFR. But I also will try to avoid highways when I can. I won't be in any rush.

I've done a few 1,000km days on my bike, and it will handle sitting on 120km/h (about 74mph) or higher just fine. Yes, it revs higher and I've noticed that more since I've bought a Triumph Sprint GT (twice the engine), but I honestly don't think that the bike is strained at those speeds. I have toyed with the idea of increasing the gearing, and while that would probably be nice, I've not been driven to do so because of problems.

In fact, I'm tossing up whether to take the X or the Triumph on my Christmas trip back home (for me, I can strap a swag / sleeping roll more easily to the X, which with the upright seating position gives me a backrest that might make for a more comfortable long trip). Having said that, I do have a new toy and I'm not riding my X much at the moment.  :008:
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: ThirtyOne on November 27, 2018, 12:33:49 AM
I have been so busy with work that I haven't gotten out of the city with the X since I got it. Looking forward to seeing what the ride is like at over 60-75mph stretches. I also got a set of TCK70s in the mail last week that have yet to be mounted. Really not digging the TKC80/Shinko 805 combo on the bike right now, especially for city riding.

New chain is in transit. Going to bring the bike tools to school and run a mini-workshop after school to teach some students how to do some wrenching.  :001:
Title: Re: Chain kit lifespan
Post by: manray on November 28, 2018, 02:55:02 AM
So far the TKC 70's are great.  I've put over 1500 miles in Mexico on a loaded bike and the grip, handling and wear have been excellent.  I'm hoping the rear gives me 6000+ miles so I can make these my favourite goto travel tires ahead of the Heidenau K60's; which are good but the front makes a hum that's annoying after hours on the highway.

(https://cdn.img.cb500x.com/Collage_Fotor.jpg)