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Topics - UnmzldOx

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CB500X - General Chat / Deer Crossing
« on: December 14, 2018, 08:02:39 PM »
Too close. I'l post video on YT when I have time. Going 60 mph on morning commute.

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Modifications, Accessories, and Appearance / New OEM Heated Grips
« on: November 24, 2018, 03:42:56 PM »
My 2014 X and I have been commuting 55 miles daily for four years in all of our weather extremes including a couple of days in snow and ice. I've learned how to get through the cooler mornings, less than 40F, by stopping for 5 minutes to warm my hands on the muffler through a thin pair of glove liners. Once my fingers have gone numb and have been re-warmed, they're generally good for the rest of the ride.

That routine is growing old, and it shows how limited my range is without heated grips. So, after my first 29F commute this year, I'll pulled the trigger on the Honda heated grips. Like the hand guards, they're expensive. But, like the hand guards, I'm willing to stick with OEM parts believing these will integrate better than other aftermarket parts.

I installed the kit over the last two days with intermittent efforts during Thanksgiving. It's like I thought, everything has to come off. This kit requires the somewhat tedious removal of the fairing, display panel plus the tank. This is my first time to remove the side panels on the fairing and to remove the panel. I usually remove the whole fairing as one piece for the valve adjustments and the same for the recent fuel pump level gauge repair. The problem with repeated work on all of the plastic panels is breaking tabs, and that I did right above the panel (gripes). The instructions from Honda appear to be detailed on the grips, harness routing and placement of the controller.  The controller is to be sealed and packed behind the display panel and that worked as described. The right grip also installed with no big issue other than discovering that the tank must be removed to access the throttle cable adjustments which is necessary to remove the throttle tube.

Then came the left grip. With regret, I razored the old grip and found that it had been secured with only two thin beads of grip glue. Ok, that's food for thought. Maybe that's all I need on the new grip, rather than slathering the bar with so much glue that will get all over everything per the instructions. So with two thin beads applied, I slid the new heated grip on . . . half way. Then it stuck like an overnight contact lens. Panic. A $200 kit flushed? No. Can't be. Got to get this thing off, now. Pull. Pry. No. This can't be happening. Brake cleaner. Pull more. Bent back a fingernail. Now it's bleeding. Glue all over finger tips and everything else. The plastic switch cover breaks in half. Electronic board is exposed. More brake cleaner. The grip magically lets go and slides back and off. That went south quickly. (Real gripes and regret at this point). Time to re-gather.

After calming down and pealing the glue of my fingers, one still bleeding, I looked at the damage. The plastic switch cover's tabs had indeed been broken. I cleaned off the glue from the interior of the grip. Then, super glue to the rescue. The switch cover accepted a thin bead of glue, snapped together cleanly and held. With that crisis resolved, on to the real problem, how to slide on and secure the grip.

The interior of the grip had been scraped by the bar edge and a few thin strips of rubber had been pealed back partially. Hoping that this thin layer of rubber is not crucial insulation for the heating elements, I pulled them off and continued. Glue was ruled out. Soapy water? Tried, but still can slide on only half way. WD-40. Yes. Surprisingly, the grip slid home and then stuck. Good enough. I'm hoping that with heat any residual lubricant will evaporate and the bar will stick to the rubber with some residual glue to help.

The remaining install involved abandoning the harness routing shown in so much detail by Honda. In retrospect, I wished I had used a few tubes of heat shrink in place of the PVC sleeves they provided. I used the other cable guides for routing and securing the new cables. After rebuilding the fairing and the other stuff, I was glad to find my X started just fine.

Then the real test. Press and hold for 1 second; three green flashes seven times. Heat is on high. With hands on both grips, I can feel the heat build. Wow, that's actually getting hot. Press for 1 second, two green flashes for 80%. Once more for 60%. Then off. Relief for now. Hope there's no damage that shows up long term. Monday's commute will be 43F. I'm looking forward to the test. Come on 28F.


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Maintenance and Servicing / Fuel Gauge Error
« on: November 16, 2018, 03:25:21 AM »
My 2014 X just showed the fuel gauge error. The indicating bars "flow" from middle to top and bottom. I'm expecting a broken wire on the pump assembly in the tank if it's like others' experiences. I read the book and most of the posts here on the subject. Is this a common failure? Age related?

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On Two Wheels / Multi-Vehicle Passing
« on: June 16, 2018, 04:07:13 PM »
To all on this forum:
I would like to hear your thoughtful views on multi-vehicle passing (overtaking). Here's the setting:

  • Rural road divided into single lanes with yellow, middle stripes to mark passing / no-passing zones.
  • Road has a section over 2 miles long that is straight as an arrow and flat.
  • There are four private drive turnouts intersecting from the right in this section of straight roadway. There is no turnout to the left, just open farmland.
  • Road terminates at a T intersection at the end of the straight section.
  • No passing zones are established by solid center stripe near 3 of the 4 the turnouts.
  • Speed limit is 45 mph.

Every morning this section of road is filled with vehicles moving around 10 mph occasionally coming to full stop or going faster than 10 mph to fill in gaps. The traffic is queued to enter either the private turnouts, or to turn right at the end of the road. The vast majority, 80%, of the traffic is queued to turn right at the end of the road, so the 20% of other traffic is waiting for access to one of the private turnouts. The wait time is typically 15 to 20 minutes to cover 1 to 2 miles in the queue to reach the last turnout. None of the turnouts are queued with cars, so access is free once one reaches a turnout.

The question is: Would it be legal, safe, and ethical for me to pass (in the left lane for US roads) multiple vehicles in this queue to eventually access one of the private drives? By "multiple" I mean an unlimited number.  Passing speed would be limited to 25 mph to increase decision making time.

My answer for the moment is yes, but I want to be corrected if I've missed something. I haven't found a law that would limit the number of cars I pass. The law requires that I pass safely. In particular it requires that I have line of sight to oncoming traffic, pass only in passing zones, and return to the right lane without causing a hazard to the vehicle last overtaken or to an oncoming vehicle. Since I'm on my '14 X, pulling into a space between vehicles is safe and easy. I probably would not attempt this in a car. From an ethics viewpoint, advancing in the queue may seem unfair at first, but since I would be turning out of the queue early, no one in the 80% group would lose their place in the queue. If a vehicle was number 66 in line prior to my passing him, he'll be number 66 again when I leave the queue.

The reason I'm asking is fear of reprisal due to lack of understanding on the part of local police or others in the queue. Maybe I'm wrong about the law, too.

One thought I've had would be to limit myself to passing only 3 or 4 cars at a time, but that would introduce many more departures and entries of the queue and thus more opportunities to make a mistake.

Your thoughts and experiences are appreciated.


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Spotted ! Was it You ? / Spotted an X BR South
« on: January 17, 2018, 11:37:47 PM »
Spotted two bikes on River Road south of Baton Rouge on Monday, Jan 15, 2018. The rear bike appears to be a 2014 CB500X.  :158:

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Spotted ! Was it You ? / Tiger Town - LSU
« on: May 15, 2017, 04:54:12 AM »
I saw a '14 X at the Highland gate today around 12:30. Member?

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I didn't see an older post dealing with this topic, so maybe my fix this weekend is rare. Along with my front and rear tire replacements, brakes were on the agenda. My 2014 500X has 22563 miles on it and the rear tire was worn. I had noticed the outer rear pad appeared to be thin so I bought an OEM set of front and rear pads from the dealer for $70 US. I pulled the rear wheel and then worked on the rear caliper. The outer pad was down to 10%, the inner pad only down to 50%. The pins were nearly dry. New pads and fresh dab of brake grease on each pin should fix the uneven wear.

The front pads were only down to 40% and were even. The pins were still coated in fresh grease.

The take away from this is that at 22,500 miles one of my brake pads was nearly worn out and that at 30,000 miles brake pads will probably need to be changed due to normal wear. Also, there might be a rear caliper lubrication issue. There is no squealer tab on the front or rear pads, so we have to inspect visually to prevent getting down to a metal-to-metal emergency. I'm not sure I would hear a squeal with earplugs anyway.

Take care.

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New Member Introductions / New from the "Deep South"
« on: November 07, 2014, 05:06:36 AM »
I'm a new owner and grown up convert from dirt bikes owned in the 70s and 80s: a Honda trail 90, Yamaha Enduro 100, and finally a Yamaha MX 175. The CB500X is a return to riding in a big way. Will be using it as a commuter on back roads mostly. Planning to take ride test soon. Excellent bike for re-introduction to riding and to the street.

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