Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Topics - Oyabun

Pages: [1]
1
CB500X - General Chat / Looking for CBR400, or CB400F/X riders
« on: February 06, 2019, 09:24:04 AM »
I'm looking for riders who are on the 400 version of our 500cc bikes.
These are sold in Asia, as far as I know Mainly in Japan and Singapore, but many of these bikes get sold to Australia, Malaysia and other countries in the region as used.
Reason is we're working on hacking the oem ECU of the series, and collecting as many ecu bins (essentially the program what runs on the ecu including the variables) as we can.
If you own or know somebody who have access to such a bike, please write here or send a PM. It would be a great help.
Thanks in advance.
Oya

2
CB500X - General Chat / Retrofit from 2019 CB500X to their older bikes
« on: February 02, 2019, 12:56:50 PM »
Might be important for those who like me hoped to retrofit some of the new developments to their older bikes.

Done some cross referencing of the new part numbers and assemblies.
So far I've done with the engine assembly and gearing.
Many of the parts are unchanged. Engine internals (pistons, crank, balancer, valves, etc) are completely unchanged from the very first 2013 bikes. Same stands for the thermostat and waterpump assemblies. Internal gear ratios are the same, although the gears have revised part numbers, but ratios are completely the same.

New are:
Injectors and throttle body: I see no significant change probably the the TB part number change is due the changed injector assembly dimensions.
Both intake and exhaust have different part numbers: haven't been able to measure the profile changes, but what is sure, that the new exhaust cam has revised valve springs - while earlier models had the same valve springs both on the intake and exhaust valves. Interesting is that the main changes of my custom cams are on the exhaust lobes too.
Completely new clutch assembly: Slipper and assist clutch - this is one of the bigger improvements of the bike. Not an STM, but a very welcome addition.
It has an entirely new mechanism with less travel and less force to activate thanks to a keyed clutch lifter pin instead of a simple dowel pin from earlier.
Revised clutch cover - seems to be protruding further as the slipper seems to be wider than the normal clutch.  Big improvement is the revised oil filler placement. I work quite a lot on 500s, and found the earlier models to be a pain in the butt to fill with oil.

I'm quite sure that the revised valve train assembly (new cams and exhaust valve springs) can be easily retrofitted to the earlier models should anyone wish to have those.
And the bad news at the end (for me at least). I was hoping to be able to use the new slipper clutch on my '13 Super adventure bike. It seems to be impossible to do. the new slipper clutch connects to a modified transmission main shaft.

3
CB500X - General Chat / Need help to find a VIN to 2019 CB500X
« on: January 01, 2019, 10:37:12 AM »
It need help from the community.
I want to cross reference part numbers between current and '19 model bikes, but the official parts fisches has not been released yet.
However I seem to have a workaround as EPC (the electronic service parts catalog available for Honda dealers) should show part numbers for any valid production VIN manufactured by Honda.
So the request is, that if any of you comes across a 19 model cb500 family bike (I'm also interested in both cbr, cb500f models, but primarily the 500x) in a showroom, motorcycle exhibition, test ride etc, please send it's full VIN to me.
I'm in Europe, so we'll receive the first test bikes only late February or early March, and I know that the bike has been released to showrooms in Thailand already, and there are a few bikes running around bike shows - so anyone arond them would be a great help.
Thanks a lot.

4
I'm thinking of getting a lightweight rear disc lasercutted.
Stock disc is roughly 870grams, I'm sure I can knock off a good 300-350 grams from the disc only, potentially up to 400 with light weight disc bolts.
The picture below is from the Yamaha R3 forums, that new disc on the left side weights only half of the original.

Anyone interested?

5
Items Wanted / Wanted: RR bash plate in Europe
« on: July 12, 2018, 05:17:57 PM »
Hello folks,
As in the topic name, I'm looking for a used RR bash plate, preferably in Europe/UK.
Please PM me.

6
Modifications, Accessories, and Appearance / Radial brake conversion
« on: June 11, 2018, 09:51:44 PM »
Hello folks,
I recently got the bug to mount radial brakes on the 500. Well, I've got the disease long time ago, but today I started asking around for mounting kits. Found none so far, so sent out a few emails.
Background:
Last year K-speed of Thailand made a CBR500R demo bike which had radial Brembos installed, but they are not selling the kit.

I've sent out enquires to them and two other manufacturers who are known to manufacture such bling. So far I've got one answer from Italy, saying they make no such item currently, but can make a small production run shall I make the design and organize a group buy.

Instead of going for a stellar priced monoblock Brembo, I was thinking about mounting a used Yamaha R6, R1 monobloc (they are considered the best bang for the money) or Triump Speed Triple R radials. These have 108mm mount pattern and should provide superior braking performance to the stock caliper.

Before anyone starts to comment that the stock calipers are enough because they can block the wheels - this mod is not for them.

Radial brakes (especially monoblock calipers) give superior control and feel of the brakes. Plus they look super bling.

The plan:
Design a caliper mount what allows to install 108 mm bolt spacing radial calipers on the standard forks. ABS sensor placement might be incorporated in the mount or to a replacement wheel spacer. Ideally the new rig should clear the RR spoke wheels too, but it is guaranteed as four pot calipers are wider than the oem floating caliper and might not clear the spokes.
This thread is active on the CBR forum also, and will be posted ro Advrider too. If we can collect enough interest to get it done, I'll come back with a price estimate and ask for commitment from those who show interest.

(Yes, I've upgraded my suspension before I started to work on this mod, thank you :-)

If you 're interested leave a comment below, as some manufacturers might need a minimum production run to make a design and CNC setup.

Attached:
K-speed demo bike
Radial brake caliper on K-speed bike
Example of radial caliper mounted on a traditional fork

7
Tyres and Wheels / X-ADV tubeless spoked wheels on the 500x?
« on: July 31, 2017, 03:30:30 PM »
Could not help but look after the tubeless spoked wheels of the X-ADV on honda microfilm parts sites.
They seem to be very reasonably priced so e.g. fowlersparts.co.uk lists the front (44650-MKH-D00) @383GBP, and the rear (42650-MKH-D01) 409GBP. That's all together equals the price of Rally raid 17" Lvl1 spoked wheel kit.

As the rear of the X-adv is essentially an NC750 with different rear swingarm, it should be a realatively easy fit.
The front end is different though as the X-ADV is using dual 310mm disks, and the axle is of the X-adv 28mm instead of 25 on the 500x. I believe both could be solved with a bearing and disk change. (the outer diameter of the axle bearings seem to be identically 47mm). ABS sensor might need some relocation or one off abs disk.

Once again - it is not a straight forward bolt-on like the RRP 17" wheels, but might worth a try for those who want to have a bling looking tubeless by design solution on their bikes.

8
CB500X - General Chat / Testing CB500x, NC750x and Africa Twin back-to back
« on: September 13, 2016, 09:00:36 AM »
Last week the Honda test fleet was in a neighboring city about 80 kms ride from me, so I had the chance to test all the above 2016 models back to back (and I have arrived on a 2016 CB500F for a good start on the CB500 egnine family).
My verdict - I'm sold again on the CB500x.
More in detail
I loved the AT. It is a blast to drive, loved the sound of it, the suspension, the engine and even the DCT. Seating was just about perfect for me, and had the best wind protection in the stock setting. It was just a bit too much for me. I would not (and potentially could not either) use the extra potential of the bike not want to spend that extra cash on it. In case i'd look for a serious mainly off and onroad long distance tourer what I'd use regularly - I'd go for it hands down. Maybe in a few years.
The NC is an interesting concept. Loved the low down torque, and the cruise ship stability, but for my purposes the under seat tank filling is a no go, and I'd have a hard time to adjust to the very low rev limit. It also feels significantly heavy compared to the X - though easy to manouver even at low speeds. With a DCT could be a good allrounder (city commuter + weekend bike), but I use a PCX scooter in the city which I consider best for that purpose and would not change to anything.
The 2106 CB500x has changed in only minor details, but definitely to the better. It is still soo nimble to handle - interestingly easier to lean from side to side than the CB500F. Slightly better suspension in stock form than earlier years, the new fuel lid makes refills much more convenient, and the led lights help to clear the way in front. Wind protection is better, but still buffeting for my parameters, and the better sounding exhaust (just like the one on the 2016 F) would be welcome also. Interestingly I have heard more mechanical noises from the X engine than from the F even though the earlier had less km on the clock. Might be because of the wind noise and the slightly "meaner" sounding exhaust on the F cancelled them. I dunno.
Nevertheless - I would still go for the 500x. Perfect fit to my use and expectations.
I hope it helps for those who are just looking what to buy. I had limited time (practically a day) to spend with them, but happy to provide further feedback should any of you have any specific questions.

Pages: [1]