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Offline mactools22

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Re: Cheap Gear Indicator
« Reply #30 on: July 06, 2018, 10:32:49 PM »
cb500xnewbie,  i had the same problem wiring to neutral switch, searched net and found someone figured out that a relay had to be installed inline to neutral circuit switch,i added relay to open and close with key and it supplies correct ground to gear indicator when in neutral

Offline EscCtrl

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Re: Cheap Gear Indicator
« Reply #31 on: July 07, 2018, 02:26:31 PM »
*Originally Posted by SnowOwl [+]
Here it is.  It's a very cheap unit I found on eBay over a year ago, it was $5.98.  It is a combo voltmeter and thermometer made to plug into the cigarette lighter socket in a car.  The plug-in part of the body held just the fuse and wiring, the circuit board in entirely contained in the head of the package.  I cut off the back part that plugged into the socket and soldered on long wires to reach back to my aux fuse box.  Then I used hot glue to seal around the display face from the inside and literally filled the inside with hot glue to encapsulate the circuit board and waterproof it.  It is stuck to the lower dash with double stick tape.  So far it has worked great and has been accurate, until last week when the voltmeter started reading 0.6v higher.  I put an instrument grade voltmeter on the battery to verify that the bike's electrical system was still performing the same and that it is the cheap voltmeter reading high.  I will just make a mental note of this fact and deal with it.  The thermometer part is still accurate.  If it fails altogether I will have to find another voltmeter and thermometer and redo the setup, but at the original $5.98 I think I have gotten my money's worth out of it.



Thanks.  :062:
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Offline SnowOwl

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Re: Cheap Gear Indicator
« Reply #32 on: July 08, 2018, 04:42:27 AM »
*Originally Posted by Bama_Rider [+]

Your first reason makes me nervous.  I have an image of a person slowing down to make a left turn across traffic while looking at numbers on the dashboard.   I would keep my eyes peeled and count to 4. :016:
I dont stare at the dash.  The process is to glance at it before the intersection and doing the downshift to 2nd gear to verify what gear I am starting in, then shift down the proper number of times to get to 2nd gear.  If I miss a shift I can glance at it again to verify exactly what gear Im in, but that is rare.

Also, the turn is in a dip and on a curve.  So, depending on how much my hooligan is showing and how much traffic there is I might be in 4th, 5th or 6th at this point.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2018, 04:45:12 AM by SnowOwl »
1980 Suzuki GS250T - Sold a long time ago
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1982 Suzuki PE175 - For exploring the farm with the dog
2016 Honda CB500X ABS - All round commuter and day trips

Offline SnowOwl

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Re: Cheap Gear Indicator
« Reply #33 on: July 17, 2018, 04:09:36 PM »
Follow up on my fix for the voltage indicator calibration issue noted in a previous post.

It occurred to me that the volt meter reading over the real value is actually a very simple fix to calibrate it.  I used a good quality multimeter to measure the current draw of the device.  It was right at 20mA.  I need it to read about 0.5v-0.6v lower, so need to drop that much with a resistor.  Ohms law calculates I needed a 25-30 ohm resistor to drop 0.5-0.6v at 20mA.  I scrounged up a 47ohm and a 56ohm 1/8w resistor that in parallel measure 26ohms.  Installed it in the feed line for the device and it brings the voltage indication to within 0.1v of what the good meter reads directly on the battery terminals.  Problem solved!
1980 Suzuki GS250T - Sold a long time ago
------------
1982 Suzuki PE175 - For exploring the farm with the dog
2016 Honda CB500X ABS - All round commuter and day trips

 


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