Author [ES] [CA] [PL] [PT] [IT] [DE] [FR] [NL] [DK] [NO] [GR] [TR] Topic: reducing jerkiness  (Read 21259 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline tango19

  • CB500X Pro
  • ***
  • Posts: 304
  • Country: england
    • View Profile
  • Bike: CB 500XAE
  • City / Town: Lancashire
Re: reducing jerkiness
« Reply #20 on: April 24, 2015, 05:23:42 PM »
Fabio,
 I , and probably many others adjusted the chain around 1000km, you are correct the chain is not the best quality.
There has been much written on here about chains.  :002:


Suzuki T20 Super six, Suzuki T20 X6

Offline EscCtrl

  • CB500X God
  • *****
  • Posts: 3130
  • Country: us
  • Wrecked Wrench Motorcyclist
    • View Profile
  • Bike: 2014 CB500XT
  • City / Town: Upstate, SC USA
Re: reducing jerkiness
« Reply #21 on: April 24, 2015, 07:09:20 PM »
*Originally Posted by tango19 [+]
Fabio,
 I , and probably many others adjusted the chain around 1000km, you are correct the chain is not the best quality.
There has been much written on here about chains.  :002:

I did at 600 miles/1000km.It was barely tight enough from the factory.I assume,this was to allow for break in of the drive train and help prevent over stressing the rear cush drive and transmission.Since adjusting it,I haven't needed to touch it again.It seems to be staying within spec for adjustment.I lube the chain everys other fill up.I'm planning a DIY chain oiler.
Artist also known as ben2go.
Current bikes
Six=Suzuki GS500,'00 V Star Classic,'14 CB500X farkled out nicely.
I rescue neglected and battered motorcycles.

Offline Grim Rider

  • CB500X God
  • *****
  • Posts: 1587
  • Country: england
    • View Profile
  • Bike: CB500X
  • City / Town: Codsall
Re: reducing jerkiness
« Reply #22 on: April 24, 2015, 08:23:19 PM »
When I was instructing used to see a lot of jerkiness on bikes; usually it could be fixed by removing the jerk from the bike  :001:
2017 BMW RnineT Racer S; 2001 BMW R1150 GSA; 1990 BMW K1; 1998 Suzuki DR350S; 1978 Laverda Jarama; 1977 Honda Camino;1962 AJS 250 CSR
www.thegrimrider.com
www.bldr.moonfruit.com

Offline grnd0

  • CB500X Pro
  • ***
  • Posts: 106
  • Country: us
    • View Profile
  • Bike: 13 CB500X
Re: reducing jerkiness
« Reply #23 on: April 25, 2015, 01:56:09 AM »
*Originally Posted by Grim Rider [+]
When I was instructing used to see a lot of jerkiness on bikes; usually it could be fixed by removing the jerk from the bike  :001:


 :745:  :008:

Offline crisb

  • CB500X Pro
  • ***
  • Posts: 359
  • Country: au
    • View Profile
Re: reducing jerkiness
« Reply #24 on: April 25, 2015, 03:26:56 AM »
As the X is my first bike, I've developed my riding style in its image. I did find the jerkiness a bit tricky to start with, but judicious use of clutch seems to deal with most of it. I also find also that as it's only the initial application that grabs (thereafter it's smooth), making sure that on tight slow bends I've always taken that up whilst still bolt upright, ie. before any lean, reduces how often I reach for the clutch. I hope that isn't setting me up with poor habits to unlearn on other bikes.


*Originally Posted by Grim Rider [+]
When I was instructing used to see a lot of jerkiness on bikes; usually it could be fixed by removing the jerk from the bike  :001:

I think quite a few such jerks are efficient at self-removing.


Offline Freeflow

  • CB500X Member
  • **
  • Posts: 28
  • Country: gb
    • View Profile
Re: reducing jerkiness
« Reply #25 on: April 25, 2015, 09:03:06 PM »
It's better to remove the jerk behaviour from the rider.  A big stick may help.

I've not noticed much in the way of jerking from mine, my 900 Hornet was apalling when I first got it and I had a Power Commander fitted [BSD near Peterborough] which smoothed things out, gave 4 bhp [4% more power over standard] and better fuel economy as well.  No exhaust or airbox mods were carried out.

The jerkiness can be sorted by technique on a bike with fuel injection from standard.  The 900 Hornet is a 919 'blade engine that was designed for carbs but running under fuel injection, most bikes like this suffer from 'on-off' throttles, although my XJR1300 didn't.

Rather than adjusting the throttle to remove the free play, or indeed to give you more 'slack' try to feel where the throttle starts to pick up, with the engine off you can find this by opening the throttle to the point where the slack vanishes and it feels like you are opening the slides.  With the engine on it's when the revs pick up.  You can adjust your hand position so that you let the throttle go onto the tickover position without getting lots of slack into the cable that you then need to remove by opening the throttle.  This will also position your hand better for control over the throttle position for most speeds you will be at.

The other thing to look at is the clutch.  The Japaneese, not the people with the biggest hands in the world, set the clutch bite point a lot further out than I like-perhaps they think Chewbacca rides their bikes?  If you have small hands you will probably need to adjust the position, mine are 'rubber glove size' 8 1/2 and I need my lever bringing in about 5mm on every bike I've owned.  Being able to feather the clutch also makes slow riding a lot easier.  If you put the bars into a right hand turn to the stop and your hand can't hold the clutch at the bite point try adjusting it.  If you aren't confident riding with the bars against the stop then do it while stationary.

Think about when you feel the jerkiness-pulling off from a stop [hand postion may help], slow riding in traffic [clutch may help], changing gear [being smoother, and picking a different engine speed may help]?

Also, think about planning ahead.  If you need to constantly react to traffic slowing by closing your throttle try leaving a bit more of a gap for you to "ride into" while slowing, that way you may reduce your need to close the throttle fully or brake and be smoother.

Offline Grim Rider

  • CB500X God
  • *****
  • Posts: 1587
  • Country: england
    • View Profile
  • Bike: CB500X
  • City / Town: Codsall
Re: reducing jerkiness
« Reply #26 on: April 25, 2015, 10:33:45 PM »
Try not using the clutch - apart from going into 1st I rarely use mine for up or down changes; and have only once had to change a clutch (due to oil contamination from a leaking oil seal) in 30 years of riding.
2017 BMW RnineT Racer S; 2001 BMW R1150 GSA; 1990 BMW K1; 1998 Suzuki DR350S; 1978 Laverda Jarama; 1977 Honda Camino;1962 AJS 250 CSR
www.thegrimrider.com
www.bldr.moonfruit.com

Offline incolx

  • CB500X Member
  • **
  • Posts: 87
  • Country: england
  • Not quite past it
    • View Profile
  • Bike: CB500X
Re: reducing jerkiness
« Reply #27 on: April 25, 2015, 10:56:55 PM »
I think this thread's got totally out of hand.  The basic problem is rather crude fuelling, meaning that a very small throttle movement can result in the application of a disproportionate amount of power, ie 5% opening results in, say, 10% power.  No amount of chain adjustment (if within the normal range) will make any difference, other than risking damage to chain/sprockets/bearing, as somebody else's noted.  How could changing sprocket ratios make any difference?  Changing gear without using the clutch is something I've tried but I can't really see any point in it.  This problem is caused by snatch when already in gear.

When I first got the bike, I found the ride quite jerky till I had the idea of adding a little play to the throttle cable, which allowed a bit of involuntary rotation without applying unwanted power.  Slipping the clutch can also help when negotiating tight turns, etc.

I also fitted a bar brace, which reduced the spring in the bars over bumps and further helped to keep the ride smooth.

Offline Grim Rider

  • CB500X God
  • *****
  • Posts: 1587
  • Country: england
    • View Profile
  • Bike: CB500X
  • City / Town: Codsall
Re: reducing jerkiness
« Reply #28 on: April 25, 2015, 11:06:00 PM »
That is one way of looking at it incolx -  another is that it has developed organically as people carry on the conversation. But keep on telling us to adjust the throttle cables if you feel it necessary. The point of changing gear without using the clutch, apart from not wearing the he clutch out, is that it teaches you mechanical sympathy and an understanding of how to control the bike without having to keep slipping the clutch,
2017 BMW RnineT Racer S; 2001 BMW R1150 GSA; 1990 BMW K1; 1998 Suzuki DR350S; 1978 Laverda Jarama; 1977 Honda Camino;1962 AJS 250 CSR
www.thegrimrider.com
www.bldr.moonfruit.com

Offline Defender

  • CB500X God
  • *****
  • Posts: 2160
  • Country: wales
    • View Profile
  • Bike: Yamaha YBR
  • City / Town: Pwllheli
Re: reducing jerkiness
« Reply #29 on: April 25, 2015, 11:53:04 PM »
Changing sprockets makes for a higher 1st gear thus making a less fierce take up without need to slip the clutch. 1st was the only gear I had the snatch throttle problem with, but changing the sprocket put all the other ratios in a better range. I did it, and it worked for me. Doesn't really matter if anyone else believes it, I have the empirical evidence of it's efficacy. As I always say though, it won't suit everyone.
If I can help somebody as I go along, then my living has not been in vain.

 


Recent Topics


victorious-backstage