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Offline Oyabun

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Re: reducing jerkiness
« Reply #60 on: January 01, 2019, 12:37:06 AM »
*Originally Posted by ThirtyOne [+]
There are. And a grip of gents over on the CBR500R forum have apparently cracked the ECU open and are navigating custom maps. Oyabun is also going to work in his lab as we speak.

Well, we're having some progress already - pretty sure we're going to have some nice new maps out this coming year. ;-)
The first head+cams combo is ready to sail out to Canada this week.

Offline Jonathan

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Re: reducing jerkiness
« Reply #61 on: January 01, 2019, 02:38:37 AM »
*Originally Posted by Oyabun [+]
Well, we're having some progress already - pretty sure we're going to have some nice new maps out this coming year. ;-)
The first head+cams combo is ready to sail out to Canada this week.

are you using the Power Commander V, or an alternative?

Offline Oyabun

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Re: reducing jerkiness
« Reply #62 on: January 01, 2019, 03:05:01 AM »
My current setup is a PCV and a WB2 (wideband lambda sensor and controller) which is connected to both the PCV for autotune, and also provides a simulated narrow band signal what is shifted to 13.8AFR instead of the oem 14.7.
The setup 31 mentions is a different rig. It is essentially a dapsberry PI used to do the autotune function as a road dyno( calculating the difference between a desired AFR map, and the stock fueling) to lrovife input on how to change fuel maps reflashing the stock Honda ECU.
The oem unit is fairly sophisticated, having diferent fuel and ignition maps for the two cylinders, individual maps for 1-2 3-4 and 5-6th gears, same for the rev limiter and such.
Ideallly the end result will be a simple tool which allows reflashing fhe oem computer with specific maps to individual changes. The reading, a d flashing of contents already works, we're currently hacking the oem compuger maps and testing reliability.

P.s. im just loving this little mill. Able to squeeze about 30%more top end power and 40% more mid-range torque is not to be looked down at. Alllways love when smart people of the internet claim that it is lkmiged to negligible improvement only. True, it is not as easy as to put a new akrspovic exbajst system to a cbr1000rr and gaining an instant 14 horsepower boost, but on tbe other hand that extra 14 woulf be only about 6-7% and probably unusable anyway on an insanely powerful liter.bike, while it is a huge improvement on an 500.
« Last Edit: January 01, 2019, 03:12:10 AM by Oyabun »

Offline Jonathan

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Re: reducing jerkiness
« Reply #63 on: January 02, 2019, 01:13:59 AM »
*Originally Posted by Oyabun [+]
My current setup is a PCV and a WB2 (wideband lambda sensor and controller) which is connected to both the PCV for autotune, and also provides a simulated narrow band signal what is shifted to 13.8AFR instead of the oem 14.7.
The setup 31 mentions is a different rig. It is essentially a dapsberry PI used to do the autotune function as a road dyno( calculating the difference between a desired AFR map, and the stock fueling) to lrovife input on how to change fuel maps reflashing the stock Honda ECU.
The oem unit is fairly sophisticated, having diferent fuel and ignition maps for the two cylinders, individual maps for 1-2 3-4 and 5-6th gears, same for the rev limiter and such.
Ideallly the end result will be a simple tool which allows reflashing fhe oem computer with specific maps to individual changes. The reading, a d flashing of contents already works, we're currently hacking the oem compuger maps and testing reliability.

P.s. im just loving this little mill. Able to squeeze about 30%more top end power and 40% more mid-range torque is not to be looked down at. Alllways love when smart people of the internet claim that it is lkmiged to negligible improvement only. True, it is not as easy as to put a new akrspovic exbajst system to a cbr1000rr and gaining an instant 14 horsepower boost, but on tbe other hand that extra 14 woulf be only about 6-7% and probably unusable anyway on an insanely powerful liter.bike, while it is a huge improvement on an 500.

I cut my remapping teeth on Megajolt, after doing a crank-fired ignition conversion on a twin Webber'ed air cooled VW, which seems like child's play compared to meddling with modern FI.

I totally get the notion of taking something stock and seeing what''s feasible, within reason...plenty will say "why not just buy a more powerful bike?" but that's missing the point.  I reckon most X owners would like more power, (especially low-mid range torque) but aren't really prepared to go to the nth. degree, due to the work/expense involved. Like you say, a 10HP increase with an aftermarket pipe and K&N isn't an option, sadly. Good Luck with the developments... :028:


Offline Superplasma

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Re: reducing jerkiness
« Reply #64 on: January 11, 2019, 10:04:13 AM »
*Originally Posted by Freeflow [+]
It's better to remove the jerk behaviour from the rider.  A big stick may help.

I've not noticed much in the way of jerking from mine, my 900 Hornet was apalling when I first got it and I had a Power Commander fitted [BSD near Peterborough] which smoothed things out, gave 4 bhp [4% more power over standard] and better fuel economy as well.  No exhaust or airbox mods were carried out.

The jerkiness can be sorted by technique on a bike with fuel injection from standard.  The 900 Hornet is a 919 'blade engine that was designed for carbs but running under fuel injection, most bikes like this suffer from 'on-off' throttles, although my XJR1300 didn't.

Rather than adjusting the throttle to remove the free play, or indeed to give you more 'slack' try to feel where the throttle starts to pick up, with the engine off you can find this by opening the throttle to the point where the slack vanishes and it feels like you are opening the slides.  With the engine on it's when the revs pick up.  You can adjust your hand position so that you let the throttle go onto the tickover position without getting lots of slack into the cable that you then need to remove by opening the throttle.  This will also position your hand better for control over the throttle position for most speeds you will be at.

The other thing to look at is the clutch.  The Japaneese, not the people with the biggest hands in the world, set the clutch bite point a lot further out than I like-perhaps they think Chewbacca rides their bikes?  If you have small hands you will probably need to adjust the position, mine are 'rubber glove size' 8 1/2 and I need my lever bringing in about 5mm on every bike I've owned.  Being able to feather the clutch also makes slow riding a lot easier.  If you put the bars into a right hand turn to the stop and your hand can't hold the clutch at the bite point try adjusting it.  If you aren't confident riding with the bars against the stop then do it while stationary.

Think about when you feel the jerkiness-pulling off from a stop [hand postion may help], slow riding in traffic [clutch may help], changing gear [being smoother, and picking a different engine speed may help]?

Also, think about planning ahead.  If you need to constantly react to traffic slowing by closing your throttle try leaving a bit more of a gap for you to "ride into" while slowing, that way you may reduce your need to close the throttle fully or brake and be smoother.



Top post, 10/10.


Superplasma.

 


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