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Offline Jonathan

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Re: 2016 head bearings
« Reply #20 on: December 06, 2018, 09:43:36 PM »
*Originally Posted by gregjet [+]
Tapered rollers are better IF the rollers are tapered as well as the races. In some cheaper bearings available I have seen tapered races with cylindrical rollers. These are MUCH worse than ball bearings. In a tapered bearing the smaller diameter end of the race travels less than the larger end ( same angle less distance). This causes the bearings to scud even if all bits are parallel. A proper tapered roller has non parallel cones with tapered rollers as well. Tapered's are also VERY sensitive to the bearing tightness load and can give false torque readings when tightening ( see the video as to one reason). Pays to recheck the tightness arter some riding if using them. That means disassembly to some extent. So if you aren't willing to do that extra work I suggest go with ball bearings as they will slop less if not correct tension.
The small contact area of a ball negates (to some extent) the problem of tolerences and skidding .
 To be honest a dual "normal" bearing top and bottom would be better. One for the axial loads and one for the radial. With small balls to allow reasonable rolling track ( steerers don't travel very far or fast axially so tend to wear a short track.
My 2cents worth.
By the way, many modern bikes are now fitting "over the counter" bearings, rather than proprietary bearings, so you often can find high quality cheaper replacements. Haven't had the x's triple clamp off yet so haven't checked whether it is the case for our bikes.

most of the OEM honda stuff seems to be either Nok, Koyo and sometimes Natchi...all seem pretty good, based on the stuff I've had in the past. I'm no engineer, so if it fits well and seems to last, I'm good
« Last Edit: December 06, 2018, 09:48:23 PM by Jonathan »

Offline gregjet

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Re: 2016 head bearings
« Reply #21 on: December 07, 2018, 07:20:49 AM »
Honda labelled bearings are often good ( the X has chinese bearings BTW, or at least mine did), but the same bearing can be much cheaper from a quality brand IF it is a common one.

Offline Jonathan

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Re: 2016 head bearings
« Reply #22 on: December 07, 2018, 04:19:24 PM »
*Originally Posted by gregjet [+]
Honda labelled bearings are often good ( the X has chinese bearings BTW, or at least mine did), but the same bearing can be much cheaper from a quality brand IF it is a common one.

I usually check the codes and see if there's anything better for similar money from trade bearing suppliers. I think the days when you know exactly what you're getting and where it's actually made have gone....everything seems to be outsourced these days. Don't have a problem with that per se, but many manufacturers 'off shore' simply because they're not subject to the same legislation.

Offline UnmzldOx

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Re: 2016 head bearings
« Reply #23 on: May 26, 2019, 05:07:16 AM »
Rather than start a new thread, I'll tag on this recent fix in this thread.

My steering had developed some resistance especially noticeable when balancing at a slow crawl. It was not quite "notchy" but more like spring loaded when turning away from the center position. Eventually it affected cornering turn-in, too. So, after reading this thread I ordered the All Balls kit and picked a good day to tackle bearing replacement. I removed the bearing cages and inspected the races. There was some light rust in the dry grease residue, but the race surfaces looked good; no scoring. Also, looked like removing the bottom outer race would not be short work. I don't see how people have done that without a special tool. Keeping it simple, I just cleaned the cages, packed fresh grease, and put it back together. After making a few nut adjustments via tapping with a screwdriver, the steering felt right.

On the road it feels like new or maybe better since it's less jittery over sharp bumps. Slow crawl balancing is now enjoyable again. High speed turn-in is now precise. Lessons:
  • Moisture will find its way in to the steering bearings causing light rust which makes a gritty pack of grease in the bearings. This gives steering a lumpy or springy feel.
  • The ball bearings are alright with a little TLC and normal riding.

Offline Jonathan

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Re: 2016 head bearings
« Reply #24 on: May 26, 2019, 09:11:31 AM »
*Originally Posted by UnmzldOx [+]
Rather than start a new thread, I'll tag on this recent fix in this thread.

My steering had developed some resistance especially noticeable when balancing at a slow crawl. It was not quite "notchy" but more like spring loaded when turning away from the center position. Eventually it affected cornering turn-in, too. So, after reading this thread I ordered the All Balls kit and picked a good day to tackle bearing replacement. I removed the bearing cages and inspected the races. There was some light rust in the dry grease residue, but the race surfaces looked good; no scoring. Also, looked like removing the bottom outer race would not be short work. I don't see how people have done that without a special tool. Keeping it simple, I just cleaned the cages, packed fresh grease, and put it back together. After making a few nut adjustments via tapping with a screwdriver, the steering felt right.

On the road it feels like new or maybe better since it's less jittery over sharp bumps. Slow crawl balancing is now enjoyable again. High speed turn-in is now precise. Lessons:
  • Moisture will find its way in to the steering bearings causing light rust which makes a gritty pack of grease in the bearings. This gives steering a lumpy or springy feel.
  • The ball bearings are alright with a little TLC and normal riding.

I've started using ACF 50 corrosion block for virtually all the lube jobs on the X, unless a specific type of grease is called for....it's much less prone to washing out. The fit and finish on recent Hondas isn't a patch on the Japanese-built bikes, sadly

 


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