Author [ES] [CA] [PL] [PT] [IT] [DE] [FR] [NL] [DK] [NO] [GR] [TR] Topic: Travelling in Ireland and Scotland  (Read 2083 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline cwjb

  • CB500X Member
  • **
  • Posts: 44
  • Country: us
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
  • Bike: 2014 CB500X
  • City / Town: Wilmington, IL
Re: Travelling in Ireland and Scotland
« Reply #20 on: June 15, 2017, 05:40:35 PM »
I'm going to answer my own question here in case anyone else is curious. What I need to drive over there is called a green card. It's part of an insurance system set up for cross border liability coverage. It was very easy to get but it took me awhile to find out about it. Absolutely no one over there would insure a noncitizen. Not picking on bikers- that went for cars as well.
I used a company in New Jersey called Motorcycle Express. They were very quick and efficient. I had the card in my hands in 6 days. Would have been less but there was a weekend involved. My bill for one month was $275 plus a $60 fee. Full coverage with theft, collision and all that would have been $575. You buy it by the month and the price goes down the more months you get. They also offer insurance to non citizens of the US and Canada to drive over here. I highly recommend them. They also offer travel med and evac insurance. And they arrange bike shipping.
I found 2 European companies that offer the card as well. Tour-insure in Germany and Alessi assurantiekantour in the Netherlands. They both would only do things by snail mail and I didn't have time for that. Might be cheaper,might not.
Hilldweller-While I am aware that Ireland is 2 separate countries, what confuses us over here is the UK. Is it one country or 4? Are the countries like our states? Specifically are the driving rules and insurance regulations the same all over or do they differ by country ?
Yes it would have been simpler to rent a bike  but it would have been much more expensive. It would cost almost what I paid (new) to rent one for a month. And I wouldn't have my tall seat, lowered pegs and stage 2 kit. I'm 6'3 and in stock trim the x is small for me. The next step up is a GS 700 for about $175 per day.

Offline Irishrover

  • CB500X Master
  • ****
  • Posts: 899
  • Country: scotland
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
  • Bike: CB500X/CB400SF
  • City / Town: Falkirk
Re: Travelling in Ireland and Scotland
« Reply #21 on: June 15, 2017, 07:41:39 PM »
Green card insurance was the norm here some years ago, but most insurance companies here offer travel in Europe for 3 months at no extra cost hence the reason why it fizzled out. The United Kingdom is indeed 4 countries in 1 with the same driving rules for all. If you have been following the news it's a bit of a disaster at the moment after the last general election and it looks like our chances of independence are gone. Hope your trip planning goes well and you get good weather, but don't forget your umbrella.  :008:
>>>> link hidden <<<<
Guest - The above link is visible to MEMBERS only. Please Register or Login



>>>> link hidden <<<<
Guest - The above link is visible to MEMBERS only. Please Register or Login

Online John1411

  • CB500X Pro
  • ***
  • Posts: 249
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
  • Bike: 2016 in red
Re: Travelling in Ireland and Scotland
« Reply #22 on: June 16, 2017, 07:08:01 AM »
*Originally Posted by Irishrover >>>> link hidden <<<<
Guest - The above link is visible to MEMBERS only. Please Register or Login
The United Kingdom is indeed 4 countries in 1 with the same driving rules for all.

But, in Scotland the drink drive limit is lower than the rest of the UK, so an English person living in England could fail the lower breath test whilst in Scotland and be banned from driving, when they wouldn't have been, if the offence had taken place in England  :187:

The other bit to watch out for is that Ireland has two different parts, Northern Ireland, which is part of the UK and Eire (the south), which is a sovereign state in it's own right. Currently the only difference you'd notice is that the speed limits go from MPH in the "north" to KPH in the "south". Note that some parts of the "south" are further north than some parts the "north", but are still in Eire  :001: Post Brexit, who knows what will be happening there?

Offline hilldweller

  • CB500X God
  • *****
  • Posts: 1442
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
  • Bike: CB500X
  • City / Town: Macclesfield
Re: Travelling in Ireland and Scotland
« Reply #23 on: June 16, 2017, 09:59:45 AM »
*Originally Posted by cwjb >>>> link hidden <<<<
Guest - The above link is visible to MEMBERS only. Please Register or Login
what confuses us over here is the UK. Is it one country or 4?

I don't think anyone born here could answer that. Originally there were 4 countries. Ireland is the tricky one, it was given to the English King by the Pope for services rendered, the English took over and treated the Irish very badly which is why many ended up in the USA. Scotland and England both had kings and over hundreds of years of fighting, partly religion based, ended up as a Union, which included Ireland and Wales.

The Irish got fed up of being kicked around by the English and kicked us out in the early 1900s except for the top bits which wanted to remain in the UK at the time. A religious split.

So yes, very much 4 countries but under control of London. I guess like your states legally but with the people having a sense of being different nationalities. There are at least three official old languages, English, Gaelic, Celtic. Gaelic ( Welsh ) is in daily use in Wales with road sign in both languages.

Normally you will get by OK in English but in many cities now you can walk around never hear English due to the big numbers of foreigners who think there is a pot of gold hidden here somewhere. In the far north of Scotland they will be speaking "English" but you'll no understand them.
Brian.

Offline Irishrover

  • CB500X Master
  • ****
  • Posts: 899
  • Country: scotland
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
  • Bike: CB500X/CB400SF
  • City / Town: Falkirk
Re: Travelling in Ireland and Scotland
« Reply #24 on: June 16, 2017, 10:00:47 AM »
*Originally Posted by John1411 >>>> link hidden <<<<
Guest - The above link is visible to MEMBERS only. Please Register or Login
But, in Scotland the drink drive limit is lower than the rest of the UK, so an English person living in England could fail the lower breath test whilst in Scotland and be banned from driving, when they wouldn't have been, if the offence had taken place in England  :187:

The other bit to watch out for is that Ireland has two different parts, Northern Ireland, which is part of the UK and Eire (the south), which is a sovereign state in it's own right. Currently the only difference you'd notice is that the speed limits go from MPH in the "north" to KPH in the "south". Note that some parts of the "south" are further north than some parts the "north", but are still in Eire  :001: Post Brexit, who knows what will be happening there?

Just don't drink and drive or have too much the night before and you'll be fine.
As for Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic as well as a change from mph to kph the currency is the Euro and the town signs are in Irish Gaelic, but he did mention that he was aware between the two differences in country. And the furthest north county in the Irish Republic is Donegal, the best by far.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2017, 10:04:27 AM by Irishrover »
>>>> link hidden <<<<
Guest - The above link is visible to MEMBERS only. Please Register or Login



>>>> link hidden <<<<
Guest - The above link is visible to MEMBERS only. Please Register or Login

Offline cwjb

  • CB500X Member
  • **
  • Posts: 44
  • Country: us
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
  • Bike: 2014 CB500X
  • City / Town: Wilmington, IL
Re: Travelling in Ireland and Scotland
« Reply #25 on: June 16, 2017, 03:51:47 PM »
Thanks a lot for all the tips and information. Really looking forward to this . I've heard nothing but wonderful things about both Ireland and Scotland. Would have liked to seen England and Wales as well but you have to draw the line somewhere.
I've got an umbrella, lots of goretex and wool so I guess I'm ready. Leaving Thursday.

Offline cwjb

  • CB500X Member
  • **
  • Posts: 44
  • Country: us
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
  • Bike: 2014 CB500X
  • City / Town: Wilmington, IL
Re: Travelling in Ireland and Scotland
« Reply #26 on: June 16, 2017, 03:54:45 PM »
Hilldweller- Best explanation I've heard yet!

Offline cwjb

  • CB500X Member
  • **
  • Posts: 44
  • Country: us
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
  • Bike: 2014 CB500X
  • City / Town: Wilmington, IL
Re: Travelling in Ireland and Scotland
« Reply #27 on: June 16, 2017, 06:19:12 PM »
 And the furthest north county in the Irish Republic is Donegal, the best by far.
[/quote]
Good to know. I'll be  spending 3 days there.

Offline AJC500

  • CB500X Pro
  • ***
  • Posts: 326
  • Country: scotland
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
  • Bike: Honda CB500X
Re: Travelling in Ireland and Scotland
« Reply #28 on: June 16, 2017, 06:55:09 PM »
Are you going to be able to post during your tour?

If you can, post when you are in the Glasgow or Stirling area and maybe I can drop by or wave to you on your way past!!

 :008:
The Story So Far.........

Offline Irishrover

  • CB500X Master
  • ****
  • Posts: 899
  • Country: scotland
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
  • Bike: CB500X/CB400SF
  • City / Town: Falkirk
Re: Travelling in Ireland and Scotland
« Reply #29 on: June 16, 2017, 08:56:49 PM »
*Originally Posted by cwjb >>>> link hidden <<<<
Guest - The above link is visible to MEMBERS only. Please Register or Login
And the furthest north county in the Irish Republic is Donegal, the best by far.

Good to know. I'll be  spending 3 days there.

Have a look at my recent video of Glenveagh, not to be missed. Also Slieve League. :)
>>>> link hidden <<<<
Guest - The above link is visible to MEMBERS only. Please Register or Login



>>>> link hidden <<<<
Guest - The above link is visible to MEMBERS only. Please Register or Login

 


Recent Topics