Author [ES] [CA] [PL] [PT] [IT] [DE] [FR] [NL] [DK] [NO] [GR] [TR] Topic: Getting squirrelly...on the straights.  (Read 1113 times)

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Offline Bama_Rider

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Re: Getting squirrelly...on the straights.
« Reply #10 on: July 12, 2018, 02:48:57 AM »
All you need to mount tires is a way to hold the wheel, a bead breaker, some tire irons, plastic bits to protect the rim, a static balancing rig and an air compressor.  You might get by with a pump but I haven't tried.  Total cash outlay is probably around $250 plus the compressor if you don't already have one.  I did.  I use one of these stands to hold the wheel https://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/p/1511/45411/Tusk-Adjustable-Height-Motorcycle-Tire-Changing-Stand ( I split a garden hose and tywrapped a section around it to have even more wheel protection.  You can buy rim protectors but sheets of washing machine detergent bottles work too.  I have a $50 harbor freight bead breaker also with a bit of garden hose rubber on it.  Throw a piece of carpet on it when you lay the wheel down.  I use a Marc Parnes balancer which is just an axle, some bearings and two cones that you prop up on a pair of jackstands.  You put weights opposite the heavy spot until it balances.  It works as well as anything a dealer does.  I've been changing my own tires like this for 15 years and doing it for friends too.  Some wheels are easier than others.  The Marchesini wheels on my Duc have deep wells and the tires almost fall on.  Other ones require a bit of wrestling.  Unless your changing tires once a week or more, you don't need any fancy equipment.
12 FJR1300
03 Duc 800SS
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Offline CorndawgX

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Re: Getting squirrelly...on the straights.
« Reply #11 on: July 12, 2018, 12:09:16 PM »
I think I'll just have to pay the Piper on this set, but I will definitely start some tool collecting for future tire swaps. Doing 120 mile round trip commutes to work at present and that will certainly eat up the tire budget right quick.

Offline SnowOwl

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Re: Getting squirrelly...on the straights.
« Reply #12 on: July 12, 2018, 03:56:21 PM »
I think you will be pleasantly surprised at how long a set of Michelin PR4's or Road 5's will last for commuting.  My OEM Dunlops were done at 3900 miles.  The PR4's now have 5600 on them and lots of tread left.  They will do way over 10,000 miles.  They may cost more than some of the tires out there, but given their longevity and superb dry, wet and cold weather handling they are worth it.

I changed the tires myself.  It was my first time and somewhat of a struggle but I got it figured out and it will be easier next time.  I used these tools that are a combination of bead breaker and tire spoons:

https://www.motionpro.com/product/08-0519

I also did it on the basement floor with pieces of 2x4 and 4x4 to keep the wheel off the concrete.  Also a MUST for doing tire changes, get some RuGLYDE rubber lubricant and use it generously:

https://www.napaonline.com/en/p/BK_7651338

I'm seriously looking at getting something like this for the next tire change:

https://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/p/1511/45410/Tusk-Portable-Motorcycle-Tire-Changing-Stand-and-Bead-Breaker

As for balancing them, I purchased a box of stick on 5 gram weights that will last me the rest of my life.  I used about a 3 foot length of ridged copper tubing that I had laying around and 2 jack stands.  Remove the old weights and insert the tubing through the axel hole and set it on the jack stands as level as reasonably possible.  Tap repeatedly on the tubing to get the wheel to settle with the heavy side down, you don't have to tap hard, just tap hard enough to get the assembly to move and settle in.  Once you have the tire seated on the rim and aired up, put it back on the balancing rig and start taping weights to the high side with masking tape until you get it balanced.  Be sure to evenly split the weights on each side of the rim.  Then you can pull the weights off, clean the rim really good at that spot, pull the backing off the weights and firmly press them on in the correct location.

Since that was my first time changing tires I took my time and had to figure some things out.  It took me better than 4 hours to get it done, but next time will be much faster.
« Last Edit: July 12, 2018, 04:03:06 PM by SnowOwl »
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Offline Bama_Rider

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Re: Getting squirrelly...on the straights.
« Reply #13 on: July 16, 2018, 07:07:33 PM »
First time took me a while too.  The more you do, the more tricks you pick up, and the faster it gets.  Using a piece of rod or tubing through the wheel bearings kind of works for balancing but wheel bearings have quite a bit of friction from seals and heavy grease, hence all the tapping.  Using one of these is much easier and, amortized across a lifetime of tire changes IMO is well worth it. The heavy spot just drops right down.  In fact it will oscillate back and forth for minutes if you don't damp it with your fingers a bit.  http://www.marcparnes.com/Universal_Motorcycle_Wheel_Balancer.htm
12 FJR1300
03 Duc 800SS
15 CB500X

 


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