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Online Superplasma

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Re: Chain Wear Question
« Reply #10 on: July 17, 2018, 09:14:19 AM »
*Originally Posted by Bama_Rider [+]
The reason a motorcycle chain has that much slack specified is that the swingarm pivot is not concentric with the counter-shaft sprocket.  When the suspension compresses the rear sprocket gets farther away from the counter-shaft.  Even when the swingarm is straight out,  i.e the countershaft, swingarm pivot, and rear axle are in a line, the chain should still have a tiny bit of slack.   If it is guitar string tight after riding it's either because the suspension hasn't risen back up to normal droop and the chain is too tight, or o'rings have failed in some part of the chain and not others so there is uneven wear.  That's why you spin the wheel around and check slack in several spots.    O'ring chains, in my experience, don't ever need adjusting until the o'rings fail.  I would never wait until I was at the adjustment limit.  I put them on, adjust once after about 500 miles because they sort of limber up a bit.  If it needs adjusting again, it needs changing because the seals are shot.   Trying to squeeze another few thousand miles out of it isn't worth the sprocket wear.


Good post.


Superplasma.

Offline VDZ

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Re: Chain Wear Question
« Reply #11 on: July 17, 2018, 12:43:27 PM »
*Originally Posted by Bama_Rider [+]
The reason a motorcycle chain has that much slack specified is that the swingarm pivot is not concentric with the counter-shaft sprocket.  When the suspension compresses the rear sprocket gets farther away from the counter-shaft.  Even when the swingarm is straight out,  i.e the countershaft, swingarm pivot, and rear axle are in a line, the chain should still have a tiny bit of slack.   If it is guitar string tight after riding it's either because the suspension hasn't risen back up to normal droop and the chain is too tight, or o'rings have failed in some part of the chain and not others so there is uneven wear.  That's why you spin the wheel around and check slack in several spots.    O'ring chains, in my experience, don't ever need adjusting until the o'rings fail.  I would never wait until I was at the adjustment limit.  I put them on, adjust once after about 500 miles because they sort of limber up a bit.  If it needs adjusting again, it needs changing because the seals are shot.   Trying to squeeze another few thousand miles out of it isn't worth the sprocket wear.
Great post.
I was about to ask a question around this very point, I have about 16,000 km and the chain has never needed adjusting, I had new rubber put on late last year so the dealer would have reset the slack. I lube the chain every 3-4 weeks under normal riding (daily commute and running around) so it would seem that this is preserving the o-rings' function, I had figured maybe I had a Granny's right wrist and wasn't stressing the chain much.

Offline Bama_Rider

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Re: Chain Wear Question
« Reply #12 on: July 17, 2018, 03:48:25 PM »
*Originally Posted by VDZ [+]
Great post.
I was about to ask a question around this very point, I have about 16,000 km and the chain has never needed adjusting, I had new rubber put on late last year so the dealer would have reset the slack. I lube the chain every 3-4 weeks under normal riding (daily commute and running around) so it would seem that this is preserving the o-rings' function, I had figured maybe I had a Granny's right wrist and wasn't stressing the chain much.
You are correct.  Proper lubrication preserves the o'rings.  Chains don't really stretch.  What lengthens the chain is wear at each pivot point added up. For instance: .002"(.05mm) of wear at each pin on a 120 link chain = .24(6mm).  The chain appears to be almost 1/4 inch longer because of a tiny bit of wear.  In a sealed chain even this amount of wear takes a very long time.  The o'rings are wearing from chain motion and they are a rubber material that doesn't stay nice and limber forever either.  When they fail, dirt gets in and wear is rapid like a non o'ring chain in the bad old days.  It also doesn't take long for that wear to impress itself on the sprockets.  You can't really see .002 of wear on the sprocket but it is there and will effect how it fits to a new chain.  If you have allowed the chain to wear to the point where you have had to adjust the chain several times, you probably ought to change sprockets no matter what they look like to the eye.  That's why I said in a previous post that I change mine before they fail.   A good quality chain, properly lubed should last past 25k miles.  I change them at 25K and chain sprockets at 50.  They are going to wear even with a good chain but should last through 2 chains if you don't let the chains wear out.
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Offline catstevecam

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Re: Chain Wear Question
« Reply #13 on: July 17, 2018, 05:59:52 PM »
*Originally Posted by Bama_Rider [+]
You are correct.  Proper lubrication preserves the o'rings.  Chains don't really stretch.  What lengthens the chain is wear at each pivot point added up. For instance: .002"(.05mm) of wear at each pin on a 120 link chain = .24(6mm).  The chain appears to be almost 1/4 inch longer because of a tiny bit of wear.  In a sealed chain even this amount of wear takes a very long time.  The o'rings are wearing from chain motion and they are a rubber material that doesn't stay nice and limber forever either.  When they fail, dirt gets in and wear is rapid like a non o'ring chain in the bad old days.  It also doesn't take long for that wear to impress itself on the sprockets.  You can't really see .002 of wear on the sprocket but it is there and will effect how it fits to a new chain.  If you have allowed the chain to wear to the point where you have had to adjust the chain several times, you probably ought to change sprockets no matter what they look like to the eye.  That's why I said in a previous post that I change mine before they fail.   A good quality chain, properly lubed should last past 25k miles.  I change them at 25K and chain sprockets at 50.  They are going to wear even with a good chain but should last through 2 chains if you don't let the chains wear out.
:460:
Great to have a 'rule of thumb' - chain every 25,000 with sprockets every 50,000  :152:

Online HerrDeacon

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Re: Chain Wear Question
« Reply #14 on: July 17, 2018, 06:51:32 PM »
I just replaced my stock chain and sprockets at 21,000 kms due to a number of stiff links on the chain. When I took the sprockets off I was surprised to see how little they wore over this distance, very little difference between old and new sprockets. I'll keep them as backups.
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Offline jsonder

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Re: Chain Wear Question
« Reply #15 on: July 17, 2018, 09:40:44 PM »
And I replaced my drive sprocket at 15,000 miles to see how long I could run the OEM chain; It is currently at 17,300 miles.

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