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Online ewryly

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Re: Lowering affects chain tension?
« Reply #20 on: November 28, 2018, 12:29:47 PM »
*Originally Posted by Rexelstar [+]
Lesson learned from a mx expert;
Optimum chain tension will be to place the three centre points in line. This can be achieved by putting the bike on weight by a (very) heavy person;)


Dang, now I have to carry a really heavy person when I go on tour.  It is hard to find depressing people when you are riding a motorcycle.

Offline Jonathan

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Re: Lowering affects chain tension?
« Reply #21 on: November 28, 2018, 04:30:15 PM »
*Originally Posted by ewryly [+]
Dang, now I have to carry a really heavy person when I go on tour.  It is hard to find depressing people when you are riding a motorcycle.

just eat lots of cakes....

Offline Jonathan

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Re: Lowering affects chain tension?
« Reply #22 on: November 28, 2018, 04:38:57 PM »
*Originally Posted by SnowOwl [+]
!!! I whole heartedly disagree with setting chain slack while sitting on the bike !!! 

The manual says to set the slack with the bike on the side stand, essentially while the rear suspension is UNLOADED.  As I said before, setting slack with the bike on the center stand will give the same result, but setting it with the rear suspension loaded will likely end up with it much too loose since the swingarm will likely be nearly in the neutral position as in the drawing posted by Rexelstar.  Doing so will end up with the chain very loose when at the extremes of swingarm travel.

Plenty of people have lowered this bike and have not had problems with chain slack.  Just follow the manual and set it properly with the rear suspension unloaded.  Doing it with the rear suspension loaded and the swingarm near neutral position will likely put the bike and rider at risk of the chain being too loose and possibly being thrown damaging the bike and rider.

I agree...but only if you then set the slack as recommended in the manual....ie 35-45 mm

the 'neutral position' has effectively changed when you lowered the bike. Basically, you'd load the bike until you reach the longest arc (axle in line with the swingarm bolt) and ensure you have at least 10mm slack as per rexelstar's suggestion. On a stock bike the manual will be as good as, but it you've changed the spring, swapped out the sprockets, shortened the chain, fitted lowering links etc. then I'd adjust according to what it needs

From the manual:Do not ride your motorcycle if the slack exceeds 60 mm (2.4 in)
This refers to the bike at stock height unloaded on the sidestand

the X is a short travel suspension, so I don't envisage the chain fouling the frame or swingarm, unless you fitted a huge rear sprocket



« Last Edit: November 28, 2018, 05:08:20 PM by Jonathan »

Offline gregjet

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Re: Lowering affects chain tension?
« Reply #23 on: November 28, 2018, 08:12:20 PM »
Snowowl, The travel on this bike does not create a sufficient arc to loosen the chain enough to cause problems at the extremes if the chain was set wit 20mm slack at cs/SWA/A line up. Unlike some extreme travel offroad bikes, where such things can happen, and various chain loading devices have to be employed.
However too tight will cause bearing failure at either or both the carrier bearing and/or the countershaft bearing. I have seen both and the most catastrophic was a Honda Spada where the CS sprockter collapsed AND cracked the case. Remember when there the chain is too tight not only is there the rearward load from the extra tension when it passes through the centreline, but also the load from engine torque added.
 Always err on the side of looser. The stock displacement will NOT be correct with a suspension rest position other than the stock one ( one exception is where the axle is the same distance above the axle line as stock position).

Offline jessica

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Re: Lowering affects chain tension?
« Reply #24 on: September 03, 2019, 12:47:43 AM »
Thanks all for helping with this mystery! It took a long time for me to figure it out, but as several of you suggested: it was a cheap chain and sprockets. Turns out that my boyfriend's "trusted mechanic" wasn't so trustworthy. At the time I didn't know what to ask and didn't know to recognize a cheap chain.

Thankfully I knew I had a problem, so I was carrying an OEM replacement chain when things got bad on a road trip. A nice dealership south of Asheville was able to put it on and save the day. I got to ride the Tail of the Dragon (where I scraped my very first peg!) and made it home to NYC.

By the way, I know I was curious about clearance when lowering my bike. If you are a moderate rider who rides one up, apparently you have to go to Tennessee to hit your limit. The kickstand length, on the other hand, continues to annoy the heck out of me...
« Last Edit: September 03, 2019, 12:48:33 AM by jessica »

Offline motorboy

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Re: Lowering affects chain tension?
« Reply #25 on: September 03, 2019, 04:30:51 AM »
The adjustable side stand from T-Rex Racing will fix your problem
It's not a big motorcycle just a groovy little motorbike

 


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